An Update on the Economic Census for the Utilities Sector

An Update on the Economic Census for the Utilities Sector


Coordinator: …at that time to ask a question
press Star 1 on your phone and record your name at the prompt. Today’s call is being recorded. If you have any objections you may disconnect
at this time. I would now like to turn the call over to
Andrew Hait. Thank you, you may begin. Andrew Hait: Thank you so much. And thank you to all of you for attending
this afternoon’s webinar. My name is Andy Hait. I’m an economist here at the US Census Bureau
at our headquarters’ office. And today we’re here to talk with you all
about the 2017 Economic Census and specifically about the local area data that we are releasing
right now for the utility sector. To get us started I want to provide a little
bit of background about the US Census Bureau. You’d have to be living under a rock to not
know that we are getting ready to conduct the largest peacetime mobilization that we
do here in the United States. This week and the beginning of next week the
Census Bureau will start mailing out forms or postcards to nearly every household in
America. Those postcards will be an invitation to respond
to the population census via the webinar – excuse me via the Web site or via a phone number. Some folks will receive the actual paper form
from us and they’ll be able to complete that form and mail it in. A relatively small percentage of Americans
will receive nothing from us in the mail. They will instead receive an enumerator, a
census taker that will come to their house and will ask them the questions that would
normally be asked on this form. But the decennial census is just one of more
than 130 programs that we actually conduct here at the Census Bureau. In addition to doing the complete population
count every 10 years, we also do a program called the American Community Survey or the
ACS. The American Community Survey is our largest
demographic survey that we conduct here at the Census Bureau. It publishes data on more than 2,000 different
variables on dozens of topics, trillions of estimates. It’s really a fantastic source of demographic,
socioeconomic and housing data that are available from the Census Bureau. But in addition to those demographics, those
household-based surveys, we also conduct 58 business surveys. Those business surveys include the census
of governments and the economic census. And it’s the economic census that we’re here
to talk about today. So let’s talk a little bit about those 58
different surveys that we talked about. At the very top of the pyramid are monthly
and quarterly surveys. The Census Bureau conducts 17 of the 22 leading
economic indicator surveys that you hear about on the evening news every evening. These include surveys, like, the Monthly Retail
Trade Survey that publishes information on the retail sector, retail sales. It includes our monthly imports and exports
data that we publish in our trade programs. And it includes a variety of other monthly
and quarterly topics. Below those surveys we have our annual programs. These surveys provide more information that
are available in the monthly and quarterly surveys and they allow us to be able to look
at trend type data. But at the bottom of the pyramid is sort of
the baseline benchmark survey that we conduct here at the Census Bureau. And that is the economic census. Every five years we conduct a complete census
of every employer business in the United States. And that economic census then acts as the
baseline or the benchmark for nearly all of those annual, quarterly and monthly surveys
that are sitting on top of it. So it’s very important that we get a very
thorough count of all of those businesses and that we have the most accurate data available
because the accuracy of the economic census then impacts those other monthly and quarterly
and annual programs. When we think about the economic census, the
economic census is our most comprehensive and complete program that we conduct because
it has a number of characteristics that are unique to it. First of all the economic census covers nearly
every single two through six NAICS code covered by the US Census Bureau. NAICS or North American Industry Classification
System is the code that we use to classify every business in the United States. The Census Bureau does have some exclusions
from our economic census. The big exclusion as you can see on the slide
is agriculture. We do not publish any data at the Census Bureau
for NAICS 11 or very, very little data for NAICS 11 because the US Department for Agriculture
publishes data in the census of agriculture from the National Agricultural Statistics
Service. As you can see I’ve also provided a link here
to a list of other exclusions. They exclude things, like, colleges and universities
that we don’t collect data for because the National Center for Education Statistics does. We don’t have data for the US Postal Service. Another exclusion because the data are available
from another source as well. But for the most part the economic census
covers nearly every industry. The economic census is also the most detailed
geographic program that we conduct at the Census Bureau. Those monthly and quarterly surveys are primarily
national level data only. There are two that do have data below the
national level. But the lion’s share of them are just national
programs. The economic census is unique in that it publishes
data at the full nation, state, metropolitan area, county and even place level. The term “place” refers to cities, towns,
villages and boroughs which is our sort of generic term for every type of local community. And it would not only include incorporated
cities (municipalities) but it even includes something that we call a census designated
place or a CDP. The town that I live in is not actually a
real municipality in Maryland. Crofton, Maryland is actually a census designated
place. So we publish in the economic census data
on both incorporated cities and on those census designated places. In the economic census we only publish data
for places of 2,500 population or more. So those really little tiny towns in the United
States that have fewer than 2,500 people would not be covered by the economic census. Now one important point I want to make about
this level of geographic detail that is available from the economic census is that that level
of geographic detail varies widely by sector. As you’ll see in just a few minutes the utility
sector is actually the smallest sector in the United States. It has the least number of businesses. So when we start publishing data below the
national and state levels, there are many, many cases where even at the metropolitan
area level there may only be one or two utility businesses in that particular metro, in that
particular county or even in that particular city. And in those cases we are required by Title
13 of the US Code to suppress the data for that particular industry. So the first tip I want to provide to you
all today is when you’re looking at data for the utility sector I would highly encourage
you all to start off first at the national and state level and look at the data at the
two and three digit NAICS code levels for the utility sector. Then after you’ve confirmed that we are publishing
data at the national and state level of those details, then drill down to the metro area,
county, and place. I talk to a lot of users who often will say
“Andy, I tried to pull up the data for every city and town in Maryland for the utilities
data and I tried to look at a particular NAICS code within utilities and I didn’t get any
results back. What happened?” And I always tell them you’re looking at data
that’s just so fine it’s such a small industry, such a small sector that we couldn’t publish
the data because of privacy. That’s your first tip. Now in addition to geography and industry
the economic census also publishes data by other dimensions. We publish data in four different tabulations
by business size. That is the size of the business as classified
by employment size and by revenue size. And we also classify the business by company
size or firm size and by establishment size. And establishment is a single business at
a single physical location. These size data are available from the utility
sector but again just as it is with the geography level breakouts, the size data does get really
thin in some of those smaller size categories and you’ll actually see that. We do publish data by franchise status in
the economic census. I will say that we don’t actually have any
franchise data for the utility sector. I’m not aware of there being any franchising
opportunities if you will in the utility sector. But we do have franchise data for many, many
other sectors. The economic census is also our most detailed
survey because it has the most detailed data variables. We publish over 200 data variables in the
economic census. These include core statistics, like, the number
of establishments. Again that’s a number of businesses. The establishment is a business at a single
physical location. We publish data on employment, on payroll
and some measure of output of the business whether that is sales, shipments, receipts,
revenue or work done for the construction sector. We also have detailed sector-specific variables. In the manufacturing sector for example we
have detailed information on inventories and assets and capital expenditures, et cetera. Some of those detail variables are available
for utilities as well. Now the next thing that we publish in the
economic census is something called product lines data. Product lines are the detailed products and
services provided by a particular business. And we tailor those product line breakouts
to each industry. So for example the questions that we would
ask a grocery store that would ask them what kinds of products does your business sell. Those questions are very different than what
we would ask for a doctor’s office or in this case a utilities business. We do publish product line data for the utility
sector but again it’s fairly limited again because of those privacy concerns. Finally the last point I want to make on this
slide is that the economic census lists a number of different data tools on the Census
Bureau’s Web site. Historically we publish our data on American
Fact Finder as being our primary release vehicle for the economic census. As many of you have already heard American
Fact Finder is being retired on March 31. American Fact Finder, or AFF, as we like to
call it, is being replaced by the new data.census.gov platform. If you have not already started using data.census.gov
I would highly encourage you all to check that out because this will be the only place
where you’re going to now be able to get those data from the economic census – well not the
only but a main place. The data are also available on Census Business
Builder and some of our other census bureau tools including Quick Facts. Now at the bottom of the slide I have a quick
note here that we also publish data on the race, ethnicity, gender and veteran status
of the business owner. In two of our surveys – the survey of business
owners and the annual survey for entrepreneurs – these two surveys are both being replaced
and completely replaced by a survey called the Annual Business Survey or ABS. The first release of ABS is scheduled for
this spring. So I would encourage you all if you’re interested
in looking at data on race, ethnicity, gender and veterans status of the business owner
to check that out. The data for the utility sector is going to
again be pretty thin because there’s very, very few minority- or women-owned utility
businesses. They do exist but there’s not very many of
them. So let’s talk a little bit about the utility
sector itself. On the left-hand side of the screen is a quick
extraction of the definition of what the utility sector includes. The Utility sector comprises businesses that
provide a variety of utility services. These include electric power, natural gas,
steam, water and even sewage removal. Those kinds of businesses are all included
in the scope of the utility sector. Within that sector, the types of activities
that these businesses do vary widely from utility to utility. Electric power would include not only generating
electric power but also the transmission and distribution of that power. Natural gas also includes distribution; steam,
provision and distribution. Water supply includes treatment and distribution
and sewage again includes collection, treatment and disposal. So this just gives you a high level picture
of what the definition of the utility sector covers. On the right-hand side of the screen is a
quick screenshot from our First Look report which is the very first set of data that we
released from the 2017 economic census. These data were released in September of last
year. And these first look numbers will be completely
superseded by national level data published at the end of our local area data releases
– our geographic area statistic releases. I just want to remind everybody that what
we’re looking at here are some preliminary estimates for the different sectors of the
US economy. As you can see on this slide the utility sector
is the smallest of the sectors that we publish data for in the economic census. There are only 17,595 establishments in this
particular sector. So the comment I was making to you before
about how the data that we publish at the national and state levels start to get thinner
and thinner and thinner. When you get down to individual metros and
counties and places, you can understand how that would be. For example in the county that I live in there
is only one utility company in that entire county. So obviously we wouldn’t be able to publish
data for that. There are some other interesting facts I wanted
to point out about the utility sector. The Utility sector not only is the smallest
in terms of number of establishments but it’s also the smallest in terms of employment. There’s only 663,273 people, ranked 18th of
our 18 sectors in the economic census. And the revenue also is fairly low. There’s only – it’s ranked 13 with about $573.7
billion. One fact though that I find quite fascinating
is the average annual payroll per employee. While there certainly are very, very few employees
that work for the utility sector, those that do work in the utility sector are doing quite
well for themselves. On average, workers in the utility sector
earn on average $102,487. That’s ranked first in the nation. So for any of you who might actually be working
in the utility sector congratulations. You’re working in one of the highest paid
sectors in the nation or actually the highest paid sector in the nation. This slide here talks a little bit about the
release of data from the economic census. The economic census is released over a year
and a half, to two- year timeframe. As I mentioned a moment ago, we started releasing
data from the economic census in September of last year. Right now we are in the midst of releasing
what we call the geographic area statistics. And they are on the left-hand side. We started releasing the data on January 9. And we will continue releasing these local
area data on a flow between January and November. If you are interested in learning more about
this flow and determining where the state that you might be interested in learning the
data for the utility sector, I’ve provided a link here at the bottom of the screen to
the release schedule where you can go in and actually look at the schedule and then dive
into more details. This is the additional details that I was
just alluding to. When you go to that release schedule page
you will come to a page that will give you information about the geographic area series
releases that are being released. At the very top of that release’s page is
a release information link that provides access to an Excel file that lists all of the different
sectors and states that have been released so far. Below there is a list of upcoming releases. This is again an Excel file that you can download
and it’s updated every Monday that includes all of the data that are scheduled for release
in the next 30 days. In between those two what’s been released
and what’s been upcoming, there’s a really nice visualization which is seen over on the
right-hand side of the screen. This hex map attempts to show all of the states
in the nation and it gives you information about what sectors and what states have been
released. All of the sectors that have a peach fill
we have started releasing data for. Once that data are complete we release for
the entire state, the entire state would then be full all the way. At the very top of the data visualization
is a menu that allows you to go in and select data for a particular sector. So I’ve gone in here and I’ve selected the
utility sector. So all of the states that you’re seeing highlighted
have utility data released which accounts for about 45% of all of the data that we will
release for the utility sector. You can see that 45% in the little donut chart
in the bottom right-hand corner. Now some of you may be asking “Wow, I’m wondering
why is it that the Census Bureau releases data for the West Coast and for the East Coast
but not the middle of the country. Why have you started on the coasts that are
sort of working our way toward the center?” And the simple answer to this question is
metro areas. When we publish data for metropolitan statistical
areas at the Census Bureau we publish data not only for the metro area as a whole, but
also for each of the counties that make up that metro area. In cases where all of the counties that make
up that metro area are completely enclosed within a single state, the ability for us
to analyze and review the detailed data for the metro area and the detailed data for the
counties is easy because all are within the same state boundaries. But when you start talking about metro areas
that straddle state boundaries then you start running into challenges because in order for
us to publish data for the entire metro area, we have to review the data for all the counties
that make up that metro area. And when those counties fall into multiple
states, we also need to review the data for the other neighboring counties to those counties
to make sure that businesses are correctly geocoded. So for example the Washington, D.C. metropolitan
area straddles five states – D.C., Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia and, starting with
the 2012 economic census, Pennsylvania. So in order for us to publish data for the
utility sector for the Washington, D.C. metro area, we would have to publish the data for
all five of those states essentially at the same time. So as you can see that sort of is why we then
start on the coasts. These coastal states have fewer metropolitan
areas that straddle into their neighboring ones. And we can bundle those states as packages. When you get into the center portion of the
country, like, Illinois for example that straddles multiple states, it gets extremely hard for
us to do that. So this explains sort of why we flow the data
the way we do. Now let’s talk a little bit about some key
changes in the economic census. When we are publishing data from the economic
census we always encourage people to ensure that the data that they are comparing over
time is in fact comparable. And often the changes that occur in the economic
census over time can affect that comparability. Geographic areas constantly change. The boundaries of counties and places and
metropolitan areas change all the time. And we have resources available that help
you go in and actually understand those geography changes. For the purposes of this webinar today we’re
going to focus primarily on the second bullet on this slide. And that is the North American Industry Classification
System changes or those NAICS changes. Every five years we publish data in the economic
census. We also publish data on the latest vintage
of NAICS which is also updated every five years. Those updates NAICS often include new codes
or change codes or even sometimes deleted codes where industry no longer has its own
existence and that code is now gone. On the next couple of slides we’ll actually
walk through some of the changes that you’re going to see when you look at the NAICS data. So again NAICS — the North American Industry
Classification System – is the standard that we use to classify every business in the United
States. We assign a single six-digit NAICS code to
every business establishment. And we then tabulate the data according to
those NAICS codes to publish the total data that we have. This system was developed by the Office of
Management and Budget. But it is also a partnership with Statistics
Canada and Mexico’s agency (INEGI). Because it is a three-country agreement this
allows users to compare data across those three North American countries. So if you were interested in looking at the
utility sector in the United States and comparing it to the utility sector in Canada and Mexico,
the data that we publish is consistent, is comparable to the data that Canada and Mexico
publish as well. As I mentioned it’s updated every five years. And those changes include recodes, combinations
and many sorts of breakouts. In some census years we do actually have splitters. Cases where a particular code was split into
multiple codes. But for the 2017 economic census there are
none of those. So these next few slides highlight the changes
that you will see when you look at data from the economic census. And as you can see on this slide there were
changes to the mining, the manufacturing and the retail trade sectors. What I want to quickly mention is that there
were no changes to the NAICS system for the utilities sector. But that means that users can compare data
between 2012 and 2017 and know that those industries are in fact 100% comparable. I always tell people before you start making
time series comparisons between our data over time, please make sure the industries you’re
comparing are comparable. And I would even extend that to other data
sources. I talk to a lot of users that use data from
other not only federal sources but private industry sources that may not be quite as
open as we are with highlighting these NAICS changes and the geographic changes that occur
too. And very often they may be making a comparison
between the industry that has had some type of constant change where it really does make
a difference. Now in 2012 NAICS there were some brand new
codes that were introduced for solar, wind, geothermal and biomass electric power generation. And in just a few minutes I want to highlight
some of the data for 2012 and 2017 so you can see how those industries have been doing
in that five-year timeframe. This is the last slide on those NAICS changes. Again you can see we did have some changes
for the information sector, real estate lending and leasing and the professional scientific
and technical services. I would encourage you all to check out the
NAICS Web site. The link is here at the bottom of the far
right of the screen to check out to learn more about those NAICS changes. So where can you go to actually access these
data? We already mentioned this before. I want to highlight it again. Our primary dissemination place for the economic
census is data.census.gov. Again I would highly encourage you all to
check this out. And as you’re using the tool we would encourage
you to send your feedback to the email address that’s provided here at the bottom of the
slide. The economic census data are also being added
to quick facts and to the next release of Census Business Builder Version 3.0. Now when we release these data we are also
putting out these nice little fun facts to help users understand something about a key
sector in a particular industry. These are the two fun facts that we have created
for the utility sector so far. In the top left corner you have data for the
utility sector in Arizona to talk about the average annual payroll per employment – $101,400. Again this is a really good sector to work
in in terms of the average annual payroll. And in the bottom right-hand corner is utilities
data for Rhode Island. In future releases we will be releasing fun
facts for the utility sector for Iowa, Kentucky and North Dakota. If you want to see all of the fun facts that
we have released so far I’ve provided a link here in the upper right-hand corner to our
visualization’s page where you can see all of those. And we even released the American Counts story
in the Census Bureau’s Web site that talks about these changes in our economy and how
the economic census helps to measure them. Now I want to provide a couple of key findings
that we’ve seen so far from the 2017 economic census in comparison to 2012. In the upper left-hand corner we see a chart
that compares the revenue of utility companies by three-digit NAICS code comparing 2012 to
2017. We can clearly see that the fossil fuel power
generation is clearly bigger than any of the other industry groups or subsectors in this
particular sector. But you can see that the fossil fuel revenue
has actually declined quite a bit between 2012 and 2017. It’s now about $74.7 billion but was a little
higher than that. Similarly when you look at the employment
data in the upper right-hand corner you can see that the employment in that fossil fuel
industry is again the most of any of the other sectors. Again you see that similar decline in the
employment in this particular subsector. But you do see that employment in the nuclear
power generation subsector is quite a bit higher than some of the other ones. These two subsectors really dominate in terms
of total employment. And finally at the very bottom of the screen
I’ve provided some information about the average annual payroll per employee. We’ve already highlighted how high this is
for this sector as a whole. But you really see how high that value is
when you look at some of the individual subsectors within utilities. I was somewhat amazed to see that folks who
work in the nuclear power generation industry earn on average about $124,000 a year in comparison
to about $107,000 for people who work in the fossil fuel power generated industries. On average just to give you a point of comparison
the average annual payroll for employment for all industries which is NAICS 00 is about
$52,000. So this is more than double the average across
all industries. I do want to remind you all that these national
level data that are available here are from that first look report. So when we complete the geographic area data
and then we republish the national totals some of these numbers may change slightly
again as part of the review of the local area data. The last slide I want to provide to you here
with some findings just gives you some information for the states that we have released so far. So in the left-hand side we have some information
that compares wind electric power generation in 2017 across a number of states. Again these are the states that we have released
so far. And you can clearly see that California leads
these states in terms of the numbers of wind electric power generation facilities. There are actually 60 in California. This number is nearly double what it was in
2012. I was actually in California last year at
a conference. And when I was driving from San Diego over
to El Centro, I went over one of the mountain ranges and the entire top of the mountain
range was lined with wind turbines. It made this data kind of really interesting. I then went ahead and since California looks
so interesting, I then went in and actually pulled out the data just for California to
do sort of a comparison between the hydro data, fossil fuel, solar, wind and geothermal
data for California just to see kind of how those different ones compared. Once again you can see how strong wind is
but even in California the fossil fuel generated power is still dominant in that particular
state. So let’s go ahead now and talk about what’s
coming next. After we complete the geographic area statistics
and release that national level publication that will supersede the first look report,
we will then start releasing data from the North American Product Classification System. NAPCS is the new classification system that
we are using for all of our old product line’s data. For those of you who might have been accustomed
to using the product’s data from the past you’ll know that the way we publish the product’s
data from manufacturing and mining, for construction and for all the other sectors was different. Those three main areas each publish their
product line in a very different way. Under NAPCS those areas will now all be publishing
on a consistent classification system which should make combining and comparing data across
sectors easier for users. Those data are scheduled for release in November
of 2020. And I would encourage you all to go to this
NAPCS Web site – URL that I provided to learn more about the NAPCS system in general. But also to understand what types of NAPCS
data are going to be available for utility sector. After that we will start releasing those size
tables – the establishment and firm size reports. Those will come out from November of 2020
through September of 2021. And finally in September of 2021 we will complete
by looking at the miscellaneous subject’s data, that includes tables like class of customer,
exported energy to Canada and Mexico, exported services, natural gas for resale, and even
construction activity. So if you were interested in knowing how much
do utility businesses spend on construction at their own utility plants, that information
is available from those miscellaneous subject reports. At the bottom of the screen just to give you
a feel for what the product data looked like in the 2012 economic census, this is a screenshot
of just some of the product data that we publish for the fossil fuel electric power generation
industry where you can see the $81 billion in total revenue, how it was then broken out
by the different types of products and services that these businesses provide. Obviously the single largest share of their
revenue comes from electric generation. But you can see that these businesses also
made money through distributing that electricity, through transmitting it, through providing
steam and air conditioning services, through providing power marketing and brokering, et
cetera. So these are all the different types of product
data that we publish for the utility sector. So in summary my last slide here. The economic census provides an amazing wealth
of business data. I would encourage you all to check out the
economic census Web site that I’ve provided the URL to learn more about the data that
we publish in the economic census and how they relate to some of our other programs. These data are all being released on a flow
basis. And there’s certainly much more data that
are coming. Again I already mentioned this release Web
site. Again I would encourage you all to check out
that site to see what’s been released so far and what’s coming later. Finally the last two points are that the NAICS
changes every five years. So when you’re doing comparisons of data over
time I want you to check out that NAICS Web site to make sure the data in fact are comparable. And the last link here is again if you haven’t
already started using data.census.gov you really need to start using it because in just
a couple of weeks the American Fact Finder application will be sunsetted. And there’s no 2017 economic census on AFF
anyway. So with that operator I think we’re actually
done. Let’s go ahead and see if anybody has any
questions. Coordinator: Thank you. We’ll now begin the question and answer session. If you’d like to ask a question please press
Star 1 on your touchtone phone. Make sure your phone is unmuted and record
your name clearly when prompted. You name will be required to introduce your
question. If you need to withdraw your question you
may press Star 2. Again to ask a question please press Star
1 and record your name. We’ll take a moment for questions to come
through. Please standby. And we do have a question coming in, one moment. And our first question, your line is open. (Caller 1): Thank you. Andrew great presentation, very, very interesting. I’ve worked in the utility sector many years. Question I had is regarding you mentioned
privacy in several of the slides of information. And what I wanted to ask is is the privacy
since the many utilities are public sector, public owned or I mean privately owned utilities,
how does that influence your statistical base and findings? I’m just curious about that and if that’s
what you meant by privacy. Andrew Hait: Yes that’s a great question and
it’s an interesting one for this sector because as you said there are such a large number
of utility businesses that are privately owned as well as publicly owned. From a private perspective we don’t care. I guess that’s the simplest way of putting
it. With only one or two exceptions here at the
Census Bureau all of our business data are the same Title 13 and Title 26 privacy protection
that basically say that we are prevented from publishing data that would expose the identity
of any single business, any particular company. Those privacy protections it does not matter
whether that business is publicly held or private owned. The only real exception to that are for government
owned and operated businesses. We do publish data in our public sector program
on governments, on state and local governments, and yes there are some governments that actually
operate their own utility businesses. And those data would then be available – the
microdata would be available – because again it’s a government, it’s a public administration. It’s a public entity. But for privately held or publicly owned businesses
we don’t care. It’s the same exact privacy protection for
both of them. Coordinator: And our next question, your line
is open. (Caller 2): Hi. I wonder in American Fact Finder there are
the 2000 census as well. What happens when it retires? Can we find it in data.census.gov or somewhere
else? Andrew Hait: Right. So that’s a great question. Right now on the economic census side we have
migrated all of the 2012 economic census data over to the new data.gov platform. So at least for right now you will have both
2012 and 2017 economic census data. And the same is also true for many of our
other business surveys. We’ve migrated over annual data for example
from the annual survey of manufacturers from 2012, ’13, ’14, ’15, ’16 and ’17 over to data.census.gov. For data prior to 2012 there’s really two
ways that you can get access to that data once American Fact Finder is sunsetted. The first way is by accessing it directly
from our API. So we have been gradually putting all of these
historical datasets or many of them out on our application programming interface. If you go to the Census Bureau’s main Web
site and go to our developer’s page, you will actually see a list of all the datasets that
are available in our API. And you can go in and either download those
data from the API or even better you can actually connect your own data tools to our API and
have that data come down dynamically. We are really encouraging people to not just
use the API download service but instead Connect. So that’s certainly one way to get those historical
datasets. And that’s true not only for the economic
census data prior to 2012 but even for many of our other programs where we are only putting
data in data.census.gov for a certain point in time forward. So the first place is the API. And the second place is for datasets that
haven’t yet been loaded to the API. We are making those datasets available in
FTP sites. In the good old fashioned 1980s technology
FTP downloads. I know it’s not the most elegant way to access
the data but at least it will continue to allow – give you access to those data. So for example we have the 2012 economic census
data in both American – excuse me in both data.census.gov and the API. The 2007, 2002 and 1997 economic census data
are available for download in our FTP site. So again it’s kind of a crude way to get at
it. But that is a way to do it. I will mention one last point too that we
have a number of other partner organizations including a number of major universities that
have decided to actually act as a repository for some of our data. And if you have any particular questions and
want to talk about some of those universities that have done that for us, my email address
is here on the slide as well as my phone number. I’m more than happy to direct you to a couple
of those universities and other providers that have decided to act as a repository to
kind of assist us with that. So hopefully that will help. (Caller 2): Thank you. Andrew Hait: You’re welcome. Coordinator: Again as a reminder if you’d
like to ask a question please press Star 1 and record our name. Our next question, your line is open. (Caller 3): Hello Andrew. Just a quick question in regards to the miscellaneous
subject series. I see that the cost of purchased electricity
for resales will be published. I was wondering if there would be a publication
of the cost of natural gas for resale if that will be published as well. Andrew Hait: Yes. So I think where’d I have that slide here. I thought I had them all listed here. Where’d it go? Here we are. So we do publish purchased electricity for
resale. But I’m not aware that we are going to be
publishing a similar table for purchased natural gas for resale. I can check if you’d like to confirm that. Again send me an email to my email address
here. And I can confirm that. But I’m pretty certain that no we’re not going
to have a miscellaneous subject table for natural gas resales. (Caller 3): Thanks a lot. I’ll definitely follow up with some additional
questions regarding that given the email that you send. And I appreciate you giving the contact information
out as well. Thanks again. Andrew Hait: Sure you’re very welcome. Coordinator: And I’m showing no questions
in the queue at this time. Andrew Hait: Okay well thank you all so much
for taking time out of your busy day to attend this webinar. I want to remind everybody that this is the
second of a 20-part webinar series. Every two weeks we’re going to be conducting
one of these webinars. On Tuesdays there will be webinars with a
state basis. And every Thursday or every other Thursday
will be a sector-based webinar that we’ll be conducting. The next sector-based webinar which is scheduled
for March 26 will be on the transportation and warehousing sector. And I’ve already started pulling together
the materials for it. And it looks like it’s going to be a really
interesting dive into the data for that particular sector. So I would encourage you all to check back
on our webinar’s page. And maybe join us on some of the other ones. So thank you so much for your time and have
a great afternoon. Coordinator: That concludes today’s conference. Thank you for participating. You may disconnect at this time.

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