The Gudger Celebration of First-Year Composition Fall 2018

The Gudger Celebration of First-Year Composition Fall 2018


♪ [opening music] ♪ ♪ ♪>>Leslee Johnson: [laughs]
Alright, welcome! It’s good to
see all y’all! This is the Gudger Celebration
of First Year Writing and it’s a wonderful way to celebrate
the good hard work that we do in
LANG 120. We have a great program. Speaking of that, there are
programs over there if you want to grab one and
there is pizza outside. And sign in sheets: if your
instructor wants you to sign in you can do that. This is our faithful
assistant Cormac. [whispers] Can you see if
Sasha needs you to do anything?>>Cormac: Why? [laughter]>>Johnson: Okay so I’m kind of
like your movie host here. Make sure your cell
phones are off. Stay for the
whole show. It’s going to
be a good one. If you have to leave though,
to get pizza or whatnot, just time it so that you’re
in-between presentations. And yeah – I’m going through
my list here. Alright for student presenters:
you have to do what I’m doing. Make the microphone make
that noise and stand behind the podium so that you can be in the
light and that you can be heard from the microphone. If you haven’t already, there’s
a media release form to sign so that we can broadcast
this good work as well. So, and then
just relax! Because we’re all here to enjoy
what you’ve done and really the hard work’s
pretty much over. [laughs] What else? After your presentation,
maybe pause a minute for – and see if there
are any questions. Because a lot of us have
projects that produce really good discussion. So, pause for a minute and
see if there are responses or questions from the audience
and then we’ll move on. When student – when
you guys come up here, introduce yourselves maybe and
say which class you were in and then your presentations will be
on the computer or you can log in and things like that.>>Cormac: Sign in [indistinct]]>>Johnson: Yes and if you
haven’t signed in please do. According to Cormac. So now it’s my pleasure to
introduce to you Jessica Pisano who is our Writing Program
Coordinator who knows a lot about the hard and beautiful
work that goes into writing and LANG 120 and the work that
we have to give to the world. Okay. Thank you. [applause]>>Jessica Pisano: Hello
and good evening! Thanks all of you
for being here! This is an amazing turnout and
I’m really excited that you’re here to watch each other,
to support each other. This is wonderful. Thank you very much. I had this whole thing written
out but I’m not going to read it because I think we really
just need to get going and see your
presentations. What I do want to tell you
really quickly is that the Gudger Celebration – what
is Gudger and where did that originate from? Years and years ago there was a
first-year writing instructor named Peggy Jo Gudger and she
wantedsomethingto be able to celebrate the amazing work that
first-year students were doing. We’ve had Undergraduate Research
Day where the upper students – upper-level students get
to share their research, but she wanted
something foryou. She started a essay contest,
which we’ve turned into a multimodal presentation
celebration! So that we can just
celebrate all the work, all the research, the
revision, the peer review, the revision, the conferencing,
the revision, right? that has gone on
this semester. That’s all I’m
going to say. Just a big “thank you” to
everyone for being here, for all the work you’ve done,
for making it this far in the semester, to your professors
who have spent so much time, dedicated so much of their lives
to you and your writing this semester, to the
Media Design Lab crew, to the library – the
research librarians, to everyone who has
made this possible. So thank you and
let’s begin! [applause]>>Aryelle: So hi, my
name is Aryelle.>>Lilly: And I’m Lilly and
we’re in Professor Johnson’s 9:30 class and our class decided
to do a video about what we’ve learned throughout this semester
as writers and thinkers. And really quick, just a
shoutout to Alexis over here. She edited the
whole
video for us, which is like
pretty crazy. So just give her a
round of applause. [applause] The reason we decided to do
a video is that we wanted to do something that could
incorporate all of our voices. All of the different
perspectives that we came from and how we’re each going
on the same track now. So, we just wanted something to
show how we continue to empower each other throughout the
semester and we felt that this would be a really
great way to do so. So, enjoy our video!>>Aryelle: Do we
just press it here?>>Lilly: Yeah. ♪ [music] ♪ ♪ ♪>>Speaker #1:
Where we’re from, where we’re brought
up, where we’re going, and how it transitions
to who we’re becoming. So, with that said. I’m from red wings
and crisp mountaintops.>>Speaker #2: I’m from
the great state of Texas, the Lone Star
State, from the coast. Shooting stars
over the sky.>>Speaker #3: But I’m from
visiting my grandparents like, every weekend, and, you know,
church services that run over.>>David Dobson: Alright,
so my name’s David, and I’m from Greenville,
North Carolina, about five and a
half hours away.>>Charles Morkel:
My name’s Charlie. I’m from South Africa.>>Akin Williams:
I’m Akin Williams. I am from Raleigh,
or the Raleigh area.>>Speaker #4: And I’m from a
town with collard greens – a love for collard greens,
love for lifted trucks, and a love for
ignorance.>>Speaker #5: So, I
am from a large family. A household of chaos and
honesty and encouragement.>>Claudia Prieto: I’m from a
place where everyone’s running late, or either
they have no watch.>>James Kub: I’m James. And I guess, like
– well, first off, I’m from Charlotte. That’s the place
where I’m actually from. But one of the things
that my – the rhetoric that, like, my parents
always told me was, like, “sorry”
doesn’t cut it. ♪ [music] ♪ ♪ ♪>>[multiple voices]:
Research.>>Morkel: My – I did my final
paper about guns control versus in South Africa
and America. Just because I
think I’ll give, like, a good outside
perspective. And especially international
students can relate.>>Williams: I did my
research project on spoken word, and how people can
use it to necessarily, let’s say, find their inner self
and help their self-identity. ‘Cause I feel like that’s
what a lot of people struggle with
these days.>>Kub: I felt the research
project like was – the first time I was, at least –
challenged to actually find reason to think on my
own and think critically.>>Speaker #7: I’m doing
something on digital activism and, like, the
effectiveness of it.>>Speaker #4: I chose something
that’s kind of controversial. I chose gun control, and I
decided to look into the emotions people
feel about it.>>Speaker #1: I researched a
lot of different ways as to how vulnerability
impacts us. So, the power of it,
how it builds trust, how it helps teams,
how it builds a stronger work
environment.>>Speaker #2: My research kind
of focused on empathy and how if we were more empathetic,
maybe our world would be a
better place. We could understand each
other and listen to each other, and use our language in a way
that’s positive and uplifting and not negative
and demeaning.>>Speaker #3: I
focused on, like, the psychological
appeal of horror movies, is what I talked about,
so, just kind of like, tracing back like, what it
is that causes us to want to, you know, spend – it’s
kind of pricey to go to the movies
nowadays. But to go to the movies and
watch a movie that’s like, you know, frightening.>>[multiple voices]:
Where I’m going ->>Morkel: I don’t have, like,
an exact planned out future. My goal in life is just to try
and reach my full potential and that’s what I’m
gonna try and do. My major’s actually mathematics,
so probably won’t have too much languages for my
future, but yeah. That’s it.>>Speaker #7: I don’t
know what I’m going to be, and, like, I think
that’s okay. I feel like that’s part of what
I learned this semester is like, it’s okay to not entirely
be sure and – I don’t know. It’s all process.>>Williams: Be the best
I can be and continue to progress
as a person. ‘Cause, you know, that’s pretty
much anybody wants to do in their life. You know
what I’m saying?>>Dobson: With all
us being student athletes, we kinda – we kinda
share the same thoughts, so.>>Williams: Right.>>Speaker #1: I am going in a
way that continues on a journey of health and self-care and
maybe inspiring and impacting those around me to
hold those same values.>>Speaker #2: Just continue
going through life with a smile, a good sense of humor, and
help people along the way. And maybe I’ll end up
on a beach somewhere. [laughs]>>Speaker #4: I think I
wanna continue my electrical engineering degree.>>Speaker #5: I wanna
go somewhere with many opportunities. Somewhere where, like she
said, anything is possible and everything’s
very positive.>>Speaker #3: I’m going
to continue that path of self-discovery, ’cause it’s
something that I’ve worked on, especially in like,
the last year. ♪ [music] ♪ ♪ ♪>>Voice #13: Below that layer
is that we’re human and that we can just
actually understand and accept
each other. Rather than have
that kind of barrier.>>Prieto: Life’s uncertain. You never know
where you’re gonna go, where you’re gonna end.>>Voice #14: You just
gotta pick some ->>Voice #15: But I guess I
kind of understand now, like, the importance of not letting
yourself get trapped in, like, a bubble of just
people that you – yeah, of people that
just constantly, like, affirm you. And I guess
that’s nice.>>Voice #16: I’m able to think
about it from a perspective other than my own. ♪ [music] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [applause]>>Aryelle: Thank you guys. Does anyone have
any questions? Cool. Well, thank you. [applause] [microphone creak]>>Olivia: I think
I made the noise. Hello everyone! Good evening. My name is Olivia Alpert and I’m
in Jennifer McGaha’s LANG 120 class and I’m going to login
real quick so I can get my project for you guys. Okay. So today hopefully I will
be giving you guys some food television
for thought. Our English class kind of
focused around food culture as a whole and I chose
food television for my research topic. I’d like to introduce my topic
to you by stating my thesis statement from my research. So, from acting as
mindless entertainment, creating bad food habits or
being a medium for creativity, food television is a
platform for many reasons. I don’t think I would be
presenting here today about this topic if it weren’t for
these two really influential food television
personalities and chefs. So here we have James Beard and
Julia Child and they acted as pioneers for the food television
industry and paved the way for modern-day food television
personalities and chefs. They wanted to give their
audience a lesson more on the love and history behind
food, rather than just the ingredients
themselves. So what is food television
doing for it’s audience? Some might say
that it is just acting as mindless
entertainment. Frank Bruni, who is a food
critic and writer forThe Atlantic, states that food
television is put out there simply to entertain. So that’s kind of what I look
like when I am watching food television most
of the time. [mild laughter] Another thing that food
television can do is create bad food habits. As dietician Lizzy Pope states,
people who watch food television are oftentimes associated with
having a higher body mass index. And there’s a nice
meme for you guys. [laughter] Food television can also act as
a medium for creativity. In an interview
with Alton Brown, Chris Weller mentions this
Instagram era that we live in nowadays where people can post
pictures of their food and use that as an outlet
for creativity. And as you can see the plating
and the way the food is arranged on the plate and just the colors
can really be used to express someone’s creative side and
even be like a form of art. So speaking of Alton Brown,
who is now called the modern-day father of food television, he
mentioned in that same interview with Chris Weller, that nowadays
people who watch food television do not necessarily want some
step-by-step process on how to make some extreme,
extravagant meal, they more so want a step-by-step
process on how to create a meal that will look
great on social media. So here you can see – I actually
made this pie and it turned out pretty on the inside but I
kind of burned it a little but it’s fine. So you know, why do we
watch food television? Is it because we want to
aspire to be better cooks? Or do we just want
to be entertained? Are we just bored? You know, that couch
entertainment type thing. If the cat in the hat
can do it, why can’t we? That’s kind of the mindset that
food personalities and chefs like Ina Garten and Alton
Brown want you to have. They want you to be inspired
to get off the couch and go into
your kitchen. They encourage everyday
people just like me to, you know, go into the
kitchen and make something. So that’s actually why I was
inspired to make this mini tutorial for you guys
on how to make that purple sweet potato pie that you
saw in the previous picture. So here’s a little tutorial and
I hope you guys learn something. ♪ [music] ♪>>Olivia: Hey everyone,
it’s me Olivia. The first step to this purple
sweet potato pie is to wash your potatoes to make sure any
dirt and residue is off of them. Once they’re washed, make sure
to dry them as best as you can. Here’s the fun part. Now you can poke your
potatoes with a fork. This will allow the
steam to escape them while they’re cooking. After you’re done
with that step, put your potatoes in the oven
at 400 degrees for one hour. Make sure your potatoes are
decently cool before you try and cut them up
and peel them. Once you have your
potatoes in the blender, add the rest of the ingredients
and mix until you have a smooth consistency like this. Pour this mixture into
a pre-made pie crust, and make sure to pop any
of those pesky air bubbles. The air bubbles will cause
your pie to crack in the oven, and we don’t
want that. Next, pop your pie in the oven
for 25 minutes at 325 degrees. Then once it’s done,
admire your beautiful work. If you know anyone whose
favorite color is purple like me, this pie would
be great for them. Now, we’re not
done just yet. Last step is to sprinkle mini
marshmallows all on top of your pie and pop back in the oven
until they’re nice and melted. I know you’re gonna want to eat
this as soon as it comes out, but it’s gonna
be super hot. So, just wait
until it cools down, and cut a nice
slice out to enjoy. So, that’s all it took
to make this beautiful purple sweet
potato pie. I enjoyed this
over Thanksgiving, and I hope everyone who sees
this gives it a try at home. ♪ [music] ♪ ♪ ♪ If any – you know, if there is
some reason or some way that my favorite TV – food television
personality guy if he could see this – I just hope that he would
make a face like one of these. I hope he’d be
proud of me. So – [laughter] Don’t worry though if
you’re not a magician in the kitchen
like myself. If you prefer to just stay on
the couch and watch the pros do it don’t worry, food
television can still fulfill its purpose for you. Like Ina Garten says, “Hey,
if you can’t summon the flames directly from hell,
store bought is fine. Don’t worry about it.” So food television
has room to grow. It continues to educate and
inform and most importantly entertain its viewers. The future is now in the
hands of new stars and television
personalities. Maybe one day. Probably not but it’s okay. So that’s all
for today. I hope you guys
learned something. I hope you were
entertained. Thank you for watching. Here are my sources. [applause] [microphone creak]>>Brandon Buckles:
[laughs] Alright. Good evening. Hello! How is everybody doing? My name is Brandon Buckles. I am representing Professor
Shepard’s LANG 120 class and I’m here to talk to you
guys about electric cars. Specifically whether or
not now is the right time to buy an
electric car. Historically electric cars have
had a few trade-offs that most people have not been willing to
sacrifice in order to own one. Things such as long
charge time or short range. And if we go back a little
bit farther throughout history, we find that electric cars
actually predate the combustion engine by around
60 years. The first electric car
was actually built between 1830 and 1840. The first combustion engine
didn’t come around until 1895. Now obviously we know at the
turn of the century electric cars died off and
combustion engines pretty much took
over from there. I’m not going to go into detail
about exactly what happened there but a couple of key things
that we can take away is that Henry Ford developed a
manufacturing process to mass market them to more
people – get more cars in the hands
of the people. And because these were
combustion engine cars, that kind of took
over from there. Another key invention
was the electric starter, because up until that time,
people had to hand crank these things and it was
really, really hard to do. So those two things,
with the greater range, the convenience of being
able to refuel your car, they kind of spelled the end
for electric cars for the better part of a
hundred years. We didn’t really see any major
improvements in the electric car again until the end of
the twentieth century. The rise of the hybrid. In 1997, Toyota released
the Prius in Japan and a few other
countries. It didn’t actually come
to America until 2003. But when it did come to
America it just blew up. They sold hundreds of
thousands of units. Celebrities loved them
and it was promoting them. It was basically free
advertising at that point. And of course a lot of other
companies actually grabbed a hold of that and decided that
they wanted to get into the whole hybrid
game as well. And so, people like Ford
and Honda in particular, they would actually take cars
that already existed such as the Civic and make a
hybrid version of it. It was pretty easy
for them at that point. It gave them the
best of 2 worlds. You could still have the range
and convenience of being able to fuel up a car but with the extra
battery power you could actually get a greater range out of it
and it was cleaner running. But the major development
didn’t come until Tesla showed up
the next year. In 2004, Tesla started
development on the Roadster and it wasn’t released until 2008
but 2 very large effects that Tesla had on the market was that
it was the only – it was the first all-electric vehicle to go
200 miles on a single charge and it was also the first vehicle
to use lithium ion batteries and this was big because up until
that point they were using lead acid batteries, which is
basically the thing that you start up your car up with, and
in order to get one that – that size that could
actually power a vehicle, it basically took up the entire
frame of the vehicle and it weighed upwards
of 1700 pounds. It was very heavy, very bulky
and didn’t charge very fast. It didn’t hurt that the
Tesla was subjectively not ugly. It was kind of sporty. They used a Lotus Elise
design, body style. But the biggest problem was
that it was still expensive. It was a new
technology. That kind of happens. It was as close as
makes no difference right around
$100,000. And that’s out of the
wheelhouse for most people. But because they were marginally
successful and showed that the technology was there, other
companies such as Nissan, Honda, Kia, Ford,
GM, BMW and many, many others decided that they
wanted to start kind of delving into all-electric vehicles
as well not just hybrids. And Nissan in particular
was very successful. They released the Leaf and today
the Leaf is actually the single most widely sold and successful
all-electric car in the world. That one car outsells all
of Tesla’s stock combined. But the charging
was still a pain. Compared to going and
fueling up your gas tank, which is right
around 5, 10 minutes, really, depends on the
size of your gas tank. Most chargers, the ones that you
would find in like a parking lot in a mall, which is basically
just a stick in the ground with a hose coming out of
it, those were very, very slow to charge
most, even the smallest, all-electric batteries. It could take upwards of
4 hours just to get up to around
70, 80%. Now, there are 4 basic levels
to these charging stations. The first two are basically what
I just told you – the little stick out of the ground with
the hose and those ones are the most common:
Level 1 and 2. But they’re also
by far the slowest. Because in electric cars, a
battery uses DC energy and what comes out of the
ground is using AC energy, so they got to
convert it somehow. Inside the cars there is this
tiny little converter that would just take a really
long time and convert and then charge
up the battery. Then you’ve got the
third level of charger, which companies like Honda
and Nissan developed this, and they thought they were going
to go ahead and just put that converter inside
the charging station. So you got something a little
bit bigger much like what you got on this
screen with the Tesla. And they got these really large
converters inside so it just converts it for you and then
sends it straight to the battery in the car. And by doing that you can a
larger amount into the battery and so with that, these –
the Nissan Leaf for instance, can go from 0-80% charge on
these Level 3 chargers in about 30-45 minutes,
versus 3-4 hours. And the Level 4 is
reserved for Tesla chargers. They have the biggest batteries
and so they need the fastest chargers and they
developed them themselves. So they’ve got a much, much
larger converter and with these large batteries they still
can go at about the same speed: 0-80% in about 30 minutes. And there’s actually – there’s
actually plans of developing within the next 2 years one
that can do that in 15 minutes. Now think about that. The gassing up at
the gas station, 5-10 minutes, for most people
who actually want to get into the electric car
business – the market, and trade up, that’s not
much of a tradeoff for them. I imagine most would
be willing to say, add an extra 5-10
minutes just to charge. Especially if these were
widespread enough that they can just charge up pretty much
at any city that they go to. Now take it a step further,
there are 2 companies in particular who realize that
the technology itself is not the only thing that’s important
with electric cars. It’s also the ecosystem
and Tesla and Nissan are those two companies. Now Tesla is already a
well-known energy company, not just a motors company. They develop
house storage units. They got solar panels and stuff
that can reduce the cost to your home greatly for electricity,
over the course of time, of course, and they also
do that at a large scale as well for cities. And Nissan is not an energy
company but they do have a deal with an energy company. OVO Energy is a British energy
company based out of Europe and they have a deal for 2019,
for the brand new Leafs that come out: anybody living in
those areas who buys a new Tesla for 2019, who wants to get
into – this whole economy, this ecosystem, they
can opt into OVO Energy. Have OVO Energy be their energy
company and Nissan will give them a home charging
unit that’s 2-way. That means that once
you’re done with your day, you come home, you still got
a ton of energy left in your battery, and you know that
tomorrow you’re not going to need much either, you can
actually send a little bit of that energy back to OVO, and
what OVO will do is they’ll pay you for that. And the estimates
are that most people, if they do that for a
year, and do it regularly, fairly consistently, can
actually cover almost the entire cost of their entire
electric bill at their house, which means it’s
basically free energy. And if you’re
charging up your car at one of the Nissan
charging stations? Those are free. So you’re not
spending any money. Now the money. Developing these cars, in
particular the battery, is not cheap. Lithium-ion batteries, even
for your phones in your pockets, they’re pretty expensive and in
2008 the cost of developing and building one of these
batteries ranged at $1,000 per kilowatt
hour of storage. Now for comparison, it was
estimated that it would need to be $150 per kilowatt hour
to compete directly with the standard car today. That was 10
years ago, 2008. As of 2018, we’re down to $190
per kilowatt hour and in 2 years it’s going to be
below that mark of $150, which means it’ll be cheaper to
build and sell an electric car than it will be to build and
sell your average sedan today. And, let’s see – yeah
so, with all that in mind, you’ve got charging stations
that are getting faster and faster every single year. You’ve got battery capacities
that are getting greater and greater every year. Tesla’s up to 350 miles now and
with the cost of building them getting cheaper and
cheaper every year, I’d say right now is a
really good time to buy one. But it’s not for me
to answer for you. What do you guys think? [applause] Any questions?>>[audience member]: I got one. Do you know what the recycling
options are for the batteries? [indistnct]>>Buckles: I don’t
know for everybody, but for – I do know that for
Nissan with this in particular, Nissan doesn’t just want
to do this power relay. They also want to take
old Nissan Leaf batteries, which a lot of people think
batteries of that size will go bad really quickly
like 10 years or so. They’re actually
rated for over 20 years. So by the time you
throw your car away, the battery still got
half of its life left. So what they’re actually going
to do is start using those as home storage as well. You know how Tesla’s like
$15,000 for one of their storage units and everything like that. Well Nissan knows that you’ve
got a lot of life left in those batteries, so they’re going to
give them to you at dirt cheap prices just using these old
batteries and have a home storage unit. You’d just need to
cover costs of like solar paneling
at that point. Yeah!
Not a problem. Anybody else? Alright thank you
very much guys! [applause]>>Fin Pray: Okay.
Good evening. My name is Fin Pray. And I’m representing
Mr. Graves’ class. So in the beginning of my genre
analysis presentation I thought I would go in the direction of
really just studies or something along those lines, but during my
research I found an article that really piqued my interest. It was an anonymous
newspaper article, and I originally thought that
it was going to be an attack on someone or something, so of
course it piqued my interest. And what I found was
that it was an attack, but it was more of a positive
attack to promote ideas within a community that
was being silenced. So you probably thought the
same thing that I did in the beginning: that anonymity
is just inherently negative and
destructive. We see it everyday with internet
trolls and we think of it as cowardly and we see how
it perpetuates libel and destroys careers. But in my research I found
that there is a more positive side to it. It’s very concise in nature. It focuses on the message
to clearly and effectively communicate what’s it’s trying
to say and it allows a voice for marginalized classes. So, anonymous writing is really
just a genre that writes for – through the method of
articulating a problem concisely with no author usually
responding to another text and it has a group mindset that
opens the audience up to any reader even though it has
an intended audience in the original article. So what I’m trying to say
is that anonymous writing, just as any writing, can be
taken advantage of and used for personal gain. But there are important messages
within anonymous works that should be discussed. One of the positive aspects
for the more influential side of anonymous writing is that
it allows a voice for marginalized classes. Throughout my articles
that I researched, each one of these has a
marginalized class that focuses their issues and
messages around it. “Women’s Work and Women’s
Values” discusses the housewife and homemaker’s communities. “Negotiating Needs and Lesbian
Partners of Sexual Abuse Survivors” discusses the sexual
abuse victim communities and the LGBT community. And then “Rights are Not Limited
in Supply” discusses the LGBT community and the
immigrant community. So for anonymous writing
as a genre for its whole, is that even the negative
side and the positive side, each are intertextual in nature
and that’s the act of creating a conversation through writing by
using other texts to create a meaning and combining
experiences and ideas. The negative side really uses
intertextuality to be hateful and insulting and uses
it as an opportunity to discredit
the community. Especially how if
you post something, or read an article, the negative
side will usually just reply and respond to this by just
insulting and discrediting the whole article. Whereas the positive side
utilizes intertextuality for pathos to create a credible way
to make the community’s ideas known and to open up the
audience to any reader. Each article I found
was consistently concise, about 1-3 pages. It was rhetorically simple,
and by that I mean I was able to find audience, purpose, problem
and claim all in the first couple of paragraphs. And the conciseness
really transitioned into the focus
on message. They focused on message to
create a clear description of what they were trying to say
and they did this through brief discussion of the cause of the
problem by referencing other articles and they discussed
the experiences of those affected by the problem. They did this to
centralize their purpose and make their
voice known. So anonymous writing really
should be considered more credible even without an author
because this genre gives a voice to the voiceless classes and
especially in this political climate where people are coming
forward with their struggles and their issues that
haven’t been heard before, people who are not a part of
these struggles or issues still feel the need to criticize
what they’re trying to say. So if you – when your
community’s issues are ignored, determined as invalid,
the world puts other people’s
pain before yours. At a certain point you won’t be
able to do anything except speak up and this genre gives you
the opportunity to do that. Thank you. [applause] [microphone creaks]>>Harrison Ungert:
Hello. Good evening. My name is Harrison Ungert and I
represent Ms. Pisano’s – one of Ms. Pisano’s LANG 120 class. Yeah and today I’ll be
talking on mass incarceration in the United States. So, I’d like to start off by
explaining you a little bit about how this
project came around and why I began to research
mass incarceration. Earlier in the semester, Ms.
Pisano’s class went to the Burton Street Peace
Garden, which is located in West Asheville. And it started in 2003
together with DeWayne Barton, who we had the
pleasure of meeting, and Safi Mahaba and this
was their way of peacefully protesting the War in
Iraq and the War on Drugs here in the United States. So I love the Peace Garden
because it was able to talk about – we were able to see this
uniqueness and talk about a uniqueness and show the human
condition in a very different and original way. First glance, you see a lot of
things like the picture on the left where they just take
toys or other objects and they repurpose it into artwork
that was left to be interpreted. So I saw this piece on the left
of an African-American babydoll within an old TV frame and it
kind of looks like a target. It’s like a stovetop. And my interpretation or my
connection was immediately to the piece on the
right who was an artist. She worked a lot during
the Civil Rights Movement. Her name is Elizabeth Catlett
and it’s calledTarget Practice. And this piece for me created
to show how the African-American community, or African-American
citizens here in the United States, have been a
target for injustice. So the United States has one of
the highest incarceration rates in the world and is
often seen as a very brutal, racialized, and unfair
system to minority groups or people of lesser income. Exact numbers change
from year to year, but the number of people in
prison in the US remains around 700 out of 100,000 people. There are more people in
prison now than ever before, even as crime rates
continue to drop down. So both the people who study
crime and the people who write policies question if the social
costs of incarceration exceeds the social benefits especially
for crimes that are non-violent. So incarceration in the US
is socially concentrated among African-Americans. At birth an African-American
male has a 1 in 3 chance of going to prison. By comparison, a white male at
birth has less than a 5% chance of going to prison. And that’s at birth. From arrest to prosecution
to incarceration, African-Americans are singled
out for increasing policing, from profiling to the types of
crimes that are highly enforced. And black men are often charged
and prosecuted differently than their white counterparts and
often can’t afford proper defenses as well in court. Out of 125,000 federal inmates,
97% have been sentenced for non-violent crimes. Prison sentences are also
higher – also longer than seem reasonable. So there are 1.2 or 1 in 9
African-American children born – or 1.2 million, excuse me, or 1
in 9 African-American children born to parents
who are in prison. So research shows
that these children, especially males,
have depression – sorry, have decreased school
achievement and higher rates of behavioral problems and
depression than their peers. These male children often return
to criminal activity themselves making incarceration
an inherited trait. So these people become
social outcastes because of their time in prison. As social outcastes they have
limited access to good jobs, credit, education, quality
healthcare and other means of improving their lot in life
unlike everyone else in society. In fact, according to a
renowned sociologist, that goes by the
name of Bruce Western, he argues that it is not just
individuals being put in a jail, but whole social groups. We as a nation have created a
deprivation of liberty for a group of people who in the
United States have never truly been equally represented. So, people are jailed for
non-violent crimes and sentenced for possession of
small amount of drugs. As I previously mentioned,
out of 125,000 federal inmates, 97% have been sentenced
for non-violent crimes. Prison sentences are also
longer than seem reasonable. Here are a few stats. So one of the big ones
is the War on Drugs. For example, federal law
mandates – mandates excuse me, a maximum sentence of 5 years
without parole for possessing 5 grams of crack or
3.5 ounces of heroin. For less than 2 ounces of crack
an offender can earn upwards of 10 years compared to 5
years for 500 grams of cocaine. 100 times the amount of
drugs for half the sentence. Perhaps no coincidence, but
most cocaine users are white and rich, and most crack users
are minorities and poor. This proves the claim that the
War on Drugs was really just a war on minority
citizens in the US. So, the contracting of workforce
inmates in private prisons creates the demand
for more prisoners. Money is made by the prison
administrators and by the corporate stockholders who own
shares of those prisons. Companies are laying off regular
workers to hire labor from private prisons where they can
pay workers a tiny fraction of what they would
normally have to pay. So this drastically
increases the profits that companies can earn. With the profits specifically
from employing prison labor tripling between
1980 and 1994. In state run prisons inmates
usually work for minimum wage except in Colorado,
excuse me, which allows pay as low to
$2 an hour. In privately run prisons, the
inmates can earn as little as $0.25 per hour for a 6 hour
shift or about $20 a month. So this amounts to little more
than slavery when the fact that most of the inmates
are black is considered. It begs the question: is this
just a new justified form of human bondage? There is historical
proof that this is true. After the Civil War
during Reconstruction, many freed slaves were
charged with petty offenses, often never proven and then
forced to work in cotton fields, mines or to build railroads. This continued prewar traditions
when slaves were hired out by owners to the
state to work on municipal
projects, excuse me. A quote by journalist Vicky
Pelaez summarizes it perfectly: “Profits are so good now
that there is a new business. Importing inmates with long
sentences after a law signed by Clinton in 1996 caused
overcrowding and violent unsafe conditions in federal prisons. Private prison corporations in
Texas began to contract other states where prisons
were overcrowded offering rent-to-sell services.” A strong profit motive
ensures the preservation of the current system. So as the prison industry
complex keeps growing crime is actuallydecreasingbut there
is no correlation between the first trend
and the second. In fact, there are so many
individuals locked up in the US that the threat of prisons
has actually diminished. The possibility of getting
caught and facing prison time does not deter crime
anymore or make us any safer. Evidence shows that a would-be
criminal doesn’t really think about the possibility of
prison or being caught. Instead of discouraging crime,
prisons actually tend to support criminal activity. The lack of
proper rehabilitation, mental healthcare, counseling,
and job training make it harder for society to actually
reassimilate these people – reassimilate prisoners. And so, high recidivism
rates ensue. So recidivism rates also reflect
the failure of this attitude. The National Institute of
Justice reports that in the US, 67.8% of prisoners
were rearrested within 3 years
of release. Within 5 years of release,
that number goes up to 76.6% of released prisoners
being rearrested. Recidivism unfortunately is
met with longer and harsher sentencing, truly
creating a scenario of revolving
door justice. In the US, political advantage
is given to those who promise to be tough on crime. It is a perennial winning
campaign strategy and it fuels the building of prisons. Drug addicts and the mentally
ill are locked up with hardened criminals with little to no
resources to help with their treatment or rehabilitation
or to make sure they do not
reenter prison. Prisons have been given the
mandate to punish and not to treat and corporations are
making money from an increasing number of prisoners whose rights
are lost in the system and whose voices are not
deemed worthy to hear. The point of a business
is to cut costs and improve efficiencies. When a business is run – when a
business is running a prison, excuse me, those costs, cuts,
and efficiencies squeeze the individuals that
are locked up. There’s no business advantage to
teaching prisoners to lead more socially
responsible lives. Taking steps to
preserve human dignity in such a setting
is costly. In order to fix this, we need
to start valuing the human being instead of
exploiting them. That’s all I
have to say. Thank you. [applause] Are there any questions? Yes.>>[audience member]: Did you
come across any initiatives being taken currently to
try to solve this problem?>>Harrison: Yeah! So as of right now, I think
one of the largest ways to solve this problem is just
going out and voting, making sure you know your
candidate as well and how they stand on privatization
of prisons and stuff. Like I said, earlier – this –
a lot – it’s very politically based with privatization of
prisons – private prisons have a lot to do with
lobbying and, you know, relationships between certain
states and certain people. And a lot of
companies, big companies, use or pay, you know, to use
these private prisons: Macy’s, Boeing, IBM are just some of the
ones off the top of my head that I can think. But yeah, also that’s another
point: really diving deeper into what companies use private
prisons and private prison labor can also help, and boycotting
them – are just some of the few small steps that
you can take. Any other questions?>>[audience member]:
In your research, how far did you look
into different presidential administrations and what
impacts they had on the past incarceration rates?>>Harrison: So in my research I
actually watched a documentary calledThe Thirteenth. It’s on Netflix right now. I don’t know if any
of you guys know it, but it dives way into the
history of mass incarceration. Three that I can think of
right now would be the Nixon administration, the
Reagan administration, and the Clinton – they all had a
pretty big part of this idea of the War on Drugs and putting
more and more people into prisons, militarizing
our police. There – I think Bush was also
another one that – he actually won a campaign
just because he was, you know, this War on
Drugs and, you know, harsher prison sentencing. There’s a – yeah so that’s –
those people have had a lot to do – another thing is this idea
of a “super predator” that the documentary also
goes way into. Just how we portrayed African
Americans in society as being inherently dangerous
and stuff like that. So that also didn’t help with
us putting more and more African Americans in a prison. Yeah, any other
questions? No? Alright, well thank you
so much for your time. Appreciate it. [applause]>>Rose Sink: Alright.
Hello my name is Rose Sink and I am representing Dr. Chess’
LANG 120 class. And I would just like to thank
Dr. Chess and Leslee Johnson and every single one of you for the
opportunity to turn what was a research paper into something
a little bit more than that. I’ll be talking about summer
camps and group dynamics and the role that isolation
plays in both of those. And I was inspired to do this
topic because – from one line of Judith Shulevitz’The Sabbath
World
and that is the book that we read as a class. And in this book Shulevitz
discusses the capital “S” religious observance
kind of sabbath, and the lower case “s” maybe
just not checking your email for a whole weekend
kind of sabbath. Essentially both just require
devoting an amount of time towards something that
you might not usually do. In turn, there is greater time
for self-reflection and just growing your community. So the actual line that
inspired me I’ll read in full: “The value of camps for
indoctrination lay in their isolation, in their being
cultural islands, which allowed them to create alternate
societies without interference from the dominant society.” And when I first read
this, I just had to stop, because she so beautifully puts
into words something that I have been trying to define
for most of my life. You see when she says “camps”
she is referencing summer camps, and this top image – I’m the one
in the middle standing up and I’m 6 years old. It’s my first
summer at a summer camp. Had the straight
across bangs. And then from 6 to 14,
I grew up at that camp, the bangs went
away thank goodness, and then the past 3 summers
I have worked there as a canoe instructor. And what she puts into words is
what my co-workers and I call “the real world”, because
working at a summer camp you really do feel like you’re in
an entirely different world and I’ll try to
summarize that. It would take a million pictures
to show you what camp life is actually like, but
I’ll try with these 4. The image in the upper-left
hand corner is of our executive director and he spends the most
time with the outside world but he also spends a lot of
time on the tire swing. He leads climbing
trips and paddling trips. You start to know what day of
the week it is by if you’re going to the pool or the lake
or if you are going hiking. You are constantly
surrounded by nature. You probably smell like
campfires and sweat and it’s really difficult to fit
into the really demanding dress code of
camp life. It’s either athletic or like,
tacky but then tackier than that and when this is all you know,
it’s – you feel so isolated from what’s outside that and this
becomes blatantly obvious on Fridays, which is when
our campers go home, and as a staff we
go out to eat. I’m sure we turn
a few heads. We probably still
look a little bit tacky, probably smell bad, but
essentially when you go out into the real world and
you’ve been isolated from it, you’re just like a sponge trying
to absorb all this information like what movies
have come out? I can’t name a single movie
that came out this summer. I just have no
concept of that. So that lead me to the larger
idea that maybe if I’m spending all of my days on the river,
instructing mostly good campers down some pretty
nice whitewater, and hauling their butts
out of the whitewater, which, like, that’s at least the
second most important thing that I do and the second most
frequent thing that I do, maybe my summer camp experience
could also be a sabbath experience because I’m obviously
building a community and I do have that time for
self reflection. So I just wanted to look
into that in my research paper, however there’s obviously
no research that says: summer camp
equals sabbath. So I did what Shulevitz often
does and I just looked into the history of summer camps and
the observable effects that they have on people who
experience them. So I started with the origin of
studies on group dynamics and this arose with social
group work in the 50s and 60s, which essentially says that:
different styles of leadership make different
group dynamics. So if I was
yelling at all of you, you’d probably be
pretty jumpy, right? And I looked at 2 social
psychologists: Muzafer Sherif and Kurt Lewin and
they did cool studies, but what really matters is
that they were able to do those studies by using
summer camps. They were 2 of the first people
to study group dynamics because it’s so hard to subject a group
to the experimental process. So they were able to do this
because summer camps can be so easily manipulated to
produce desired outcomes. So thinking about that: it’s
pretty cool if you’re a social psychologist, but that’s also
really cool if you’re a summer camp, or the American
Camp Association, which accredits hundreds of
summer camps across the country. And essentially they have a
mission to foster camper’s growth and development. And they did this study
between 2001 and 2004 titled, “Youth Development Outcomes
of the Camp Experience.” And they did this
to see, you know, what actually are the effects
of summer camps on kids? And how can summer camps as a
whole better reach the kids that they are trying to help,
like trying to help grow? So they looked at 4 large
developmental categories which are highlighted in yellow
and all of these saw large improvement and that improvement
was sustained 6 months after the camp experience. And then they also looked at 10
subcategories and I believe 9 of those also saw that
same sustained growth. However it was really
interesting because stuff like the experience of the directing
staff or the experience of the counselor didn’t really matter
with the growth of the child. So whatdidmatter was specific
programming that directly targets some of
these topics. So my camp is religiously
affiliated and therefore would see a higher
growth in spirituality. My camp is also an overnight
camp and in general those had better scores with
physical and thinking skills. So this is great for camps
because they’re able to see, “Okay, we want to make
kids better leaders. We should have some
sort of program that directly
addresses that.” But it’s also great for parents
because if you specifically want your child to grow
in a certain way, you can check with different
summer camps and see if they have a program
to do that. Lastly, as a country we send
millions of kids to summer camps each summer, however,
a lot of them are not financially accessible. So if so many kids are
going to summer camp, and those kids are being
positively impacted by it, if we start seeing camps as
something essential for the development of a child maybe
as a society we can level the playing field and try
to get everyone to have that same
positive impact. And I also just want to ask all
of you to look at your own life and think about something that
you might do that could also be considered a sabbath experience
and try to give that the attention that
it deserves. Thank you. [applause] Yeah?>>[audience member]: Yeah, you
talked about a lot of the studies and stuff
that were done. Were there any direct
results that you found? Like say a kid
went for, you know, leadership skills or they were
a little bit too shy and were trying to develop
their social skills. In your findings did you
have any direct results that came
out of that? Like a child that was observed
in one of these studies, like what was
the result? Like when he went back to school
or went back to the family?>>Rose: Well this study, it
used camper surveys but it also used parent surveys. So the parents were sent a
separate survey 6 months after the camp experience
where they would, you know, fill out on
a chart how they think their child
is doing. I’m sure that there
are studies like that, but the one I looked
at was very general. Does that answer
your question?>>[audience member]: Not
entirely but I understand why.>>Rose: Sorry.>>[audience member]: Thank you.>>Rose: Any more? Thank you. [applause]>>Sylvie Randall: Hi. We’re
from Professor Johnson’s 8 am LANG 120 and we’re
going to show our collaborative
project for you.>>Sydney Wiedbrauk: But prior
to that we kind of just wrote something to kind of
just introduct it. So, first off, I’m
going to start off. Now I know we all love
getting our sleep, right? But I also know how hard it
can be to get the right amount of sleep every night. So, whether we wake
up at 6 am, 6:30, 7:30 or even the
occasional 8, my peers and I, on Monday, Wednesdays, and
Fridays still have our LANG 120 at 8 am with
Professor Johnson. Now this presentation is kind
of a compilation of our words, our pieces in which we have
created throughout the duration of this course, and these
words are what we wish to share with
you today. Now, despite oftentimes not
really talking during class, we’re hoping this presentation
kind of compensates for that. [laughter]>>Sylvie Randall: We’ve
all worked super hard, waking up early, feeling
the weight of morning. Starting off the days
sometimes with stuff to say and sometimes with
nothing at all. Throughout the good
days and the bad, we’ve still worked
hard and pushed through. In the early mornings
and the late nights, we’ve been developing our own
styles through the constant evolution that
comes with writing. This collaborative presentation
showcases all that we have done this year, highlighting our
personalities within our work. Our collaborative
presentation is titled,We Woke Up: The Evolution of
Our Words
, which begins with lines from our recreation of the
“I Am From” poems that we wrote at the beginning of
our time together. Followed by pieces
that we all created throughout
this semester. Here it is. ♪ [music] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪>>Taylor Friedlander:
My name is Taylor, I am from Italian
dinners with Grandma and Wonder Bread
with Pop-Pop. I’m from a time of many movings
and football games with the salty smell of
concession stands.>>Anna Skryd:
I’m Anna Skryd. I am from riding through
the brush of the woods, listening to mother
nature roar like clockwork. I am from hard work
and determination, where “no” is never
a stopping point. I am from hours upon hours
of practicing on the court training for
what’s to come.>>Owen Fieweger:
Hi, I’m Owen. I am from my father’s curse
words when he stubs his toe, bangs his knee, or burns
himself on the stove.>>Nicholas Grandstaff: I’m
Nicholas Grandstaff and I’m from Hillsborough, North Carolina,
where I’m too much of a country boy to hang with
the city slickers, and too much of a city slicker
to hang with the country boys.>>Zayn Santiago
Perez: Hey, I am Zayn. And I’m from behind a camera and
the [indistinct] pen in my hand, where every curving
word describes all of my blended
emotions. ♪ [music] ♪ ♪ ♪>>Speaker #1: Here to talk
about some LANG 120! What do you think you guys are
gonna remember about this class?>>Speaker #2: You know, I’ll
probably remember how early I had to wake up and
come to this class. But it was worth
it in the end.>>Speaker #3: Yeah, same.
All the late nights. And I remember
that I have an 8 am. [laughter]>>Speaker #1: How have you
grown as a writer, do you think?>>Speaker #4: Not
so much as a writer, but as a person, which
made me a better writer, just having a different
perspective on things. And learning what language I
can use to convey the ideas that are in
my head.>>Speaker #5: For me I had to
figure out different textures of writing to be able to
get my point across and go further into my research
or further into my story. And it helped I
guess open that up.>>Speaker #6: Us as students
to be able to provide, genuine work instead of having
to kind of pretend in case – or to just do it for a grade,
we can do it for ourselves. ♪ [music] ♪ ♪ ♪>>Speaker #7: In the past, I
would just kind of be like, “Oh, I’ll just read my
paper once and submit it. Call it good.” But after talking about it
more, like the more you revise, and if you go over
it more than once, you just see, like, new
ideas that could fit, mistakes or more
things you could add and, you know,
elaborate on. So, I think that
will help me.>>Speaker #8: I cared
about my topic and I really couldn’t –
I couldn’t let go of it. Like, I actually ended
up totally changing my thesis at one point, and
totally getting new research. ‘Cause I was,
like, “I can’t. I can’t do
this, you know? Like, this would be
a sham if I were to just continue
with this.” And that, I think, was
the wholeresearchthing. I had to look at it and
come full circle to realize that, like, I needed to
work something different.>>Speaker #9: I agree
with that.>>Friedlander: I did
my research on animal testing
cosmetics. And I created a website
called “Cruelty-Free Friends”, where I basically gave
background information on animal testing and ways
that you can help. ♪ [music] ♪ ♪ ♪>>Ryan Simpson:
Hey, I’m Ryan. I researched the Eastern and
Western cultural divide between philosophies and cultures. And for my project, I ended up
recording a podcast – it was about 25 minutes long – and we
discussed everything ranging fromSiddhartha, the book
that came out in the 20s, to more modern philosophies
concerning Alan Watts.>>Kindra Mingo:
Hi, I’m Kindra Mingo, and I researched overcoming
emotional abuse by using creative writing.>>Santiago Perez: I am going to
reach my goals no matter what. My blended emotions nor the man
who is called the president of the United States
will stop me. ♪[music]♪ ♪ ♪>>Speaker #10: I am going to a
small-town party one mile away. Mask made of glass. I won’t approach
I am sure.>>Mingo: I’m going to be a
mindful person and an eminent student, and will be
diligent in everything I do. Kindra Mingo.>>Johanna Ayala: At first, when
I wrote the piece and she looked at it, she was like, “Oh,
there’s more here you could talk about, there’s more
to the story, I can tell.” And I was like, “Oh my
gosh, I don’t know if I wanna talk
about this!” And then I opened up
more and was able to, talk more in-depth
about it.>>Speaker #11: At first, I
really didn’t want to – I was just curious, so I didn’t want
to go in-depth as much as I did. But what I found through digging
deeper was pretty interesting. ♪ [music] ♪>>Speaker #12: What will you
take away from this class?>>Skryd: Like
revision strategies, and just other
writing. I don’t know if the
word’s techniques, but just ways to organize
and make a good paper. And I guess revising is
done through that as well.>>Speaker #13: Definitely
going to the Writing Center and professor, and other
college students as well, getting their perspective has
helped me look at things in a different way
when revising.>>Speaker #14:
Being able to go after something you
care, and then also, come at it in whatever in
the form that you want.>>Speaker #15: You can attack
it from a different angle than what
you’ve seen.>>Speaker #14: Exactly. [applause]>>Sylvie Randall:
Are there any questions? Okay cool. Thank you! [applause]>>Mara Shepard-Edwards:
Hi my name is Mara Shepard and this is
my video presentation on Nelson Mandela and my
teacher is Ms. Pisano. ♪ [music] ♪>>Shephard: The Burton
Street Community Association is located in
West Asheville, and was established to
promote the well-being of an historically African
-American neighborhood. There is a portrait of Nelson
Mandela in their Peace Garden. Nelson Mandela was
a wise visionary, a political leader, and
influential civil rights activist who had a positive
impact not only in his home country of South Africa,
but the entire world. He explained that, “There was no
particular day on which I said, ‘Henceforth, I will devote
myself to the liberation of my people.’ Instead, I simply
found myself doing so and could not
do otherwise.” The Apartheid system in South
Africa in the 1960s allowed for racial segregation, as well
as economic and political discrimination
against non-whites. Laws restricted
socializing between races; banned non-whites in
the national government; allowed for public facilities,
the educational system, as well as land
to be segregated.>>Nelson Mandela: We have made
it very clear in our policy. That South Africa is a
country of many races. There is room forallthe
various races in this country.>>Shephard: Mandela said, “If
there is one lesson we can learn from the struggle
against racism, it is that racism
must be combated and not discretely
tolerated.” He believed that people having
the opportunity to live in harmony was worth fighting
for, and more important than preserving his own
personal safety. In 1964, he was sentenced
to life imprisonment. Prison provided Mandela
with time to reflect. And from a situation of such
constraint and limitation, allowed him to consider the
most effective form of action. He said, “It is never my
custom to use words lightly. If 27 years in prison
have done anything to us, it was to use the silence of
solitude to make us understand how precious words are, and how
real speech is in its impact on the way people
live and die.”>>Mandela:
Well you know, the fact that you could
just sit alone and think gave us a wonderful
opportunity to change ourselves’
young behavior. I felt quite ashamed because I
became busy with politics and with law, and I forgot that the
people were very kind to me when I arrived in
Johannesburg. And I said, “If I ever get a
chance of coming out,” as I was sure I would eventually,
no matter after how long, “I want to make up for
the omissions I made.”>>Shephard: Over the
span of several years, Mandela persistently wrote
letters until he was able to see the South African president
and begin negotiations. In 1993, the pro-Apartheid
legislation was appealed. By the next year, Mandela became
the first African president in a democratic election
for South Africa.>>[Speaker]: I accordingly
take great pleasure in announcing the election of
comrade Nelson Mandela to the post of president. [applause] ♪ [singing] ♪
[applause] ♪ [singing] ♪>>Shephard: In
South Africa, there is a cultural
belief called ubuntu. It can be understood as the
ethics of interconnectedness between individuals and the
natural environment to ensure people’s wellbeing,
dignity, and livelihoods. The concept is based on the
recognition of diversity, that we are only people
because of other people. Nelson Mandela is thought
by many to be the personification
of ubuntu. He said, “The purpose of freedom
is to create it for others.” Mandela made an
impact in the US, because in America in the 60s,
there were civil rights marches, boycotts, sit-ins, and arrests,
which mirrored civil rights protests in
South Africa. He has also influenced
American politics.>>Barrack Obama: I believe
in Nelson Mandela’s vision. I believe in a
vision shared by Gandhi, and King, and Abraham Lincoln. I believe in a
vision of equality, and justice, and freedom,
and multiracial democracy, built on the premise that
all peoplearecreated equal. And they’re endowed
by our creator with certain
inalienable rights. [applause]>>Shephard: The Burton
Street Community Association is involved
in social enterprise, art, and environmental
projects that were created to improve the
community. These projects follow Mandela’s
approach for creating a better society through community
action and involvement. His portrait lies in the
Burton Street Community Garden, because the garden is a
place of collaboration, recognition, and peace. ♪[singing]♪
[applause] ♪[singing]♪>>Shepherd: Any questions? ♪[singing]♪ [applause]>>Shannon Copeland:
Hello everybody. Can we all just
take a deep breath? [inhales] And out. Okay that was for
me not for you. [laughter] Okay so my name is
Shannon Copeland and I am representing Taylor
Sykes’ LANG 120 class. And we did
autoethnographies. We analyzed an in-group
that we were a part of. Alcohol is the
perfect solvent. It essentially dissolves the
life of the alcoholic as a whole, but that is not
just exclusively for alcohol. It’s really any addictive
substances in general. So, that being said I
want to talk about my mom. So I am the daughter
of a substance abuser and an alcoholic. My mom started exploring with
different drugs before she even graduated from
high school. She whizzed through college with
flying colors either completely wasted or extremely high or a
combination of the two and still ended up with 3
degrees somehow. She was so
book smart. Just the common sense
wasn’t exactly there. One of the 3 degrees that she
received qualified her to become a physician’s assistant so that
was the first job that she had when she graduated
from college. She met my dad. Later on had my brother Tyler
and then 4 years later had me, and our relationship stayed
strong for a really long time. Well, my parents were
also married while they still
lived together. My dad sort of sheltered
me from her attitudes and from her
addiction. I found out that I was a
member of this in-group when I was 10
years old. I was spending the
weekend with my mom. It was Fourth of July and she
actually overdosed that night and needless to say it
was a pretty traumatic experience for me. When my dad picked me
up it was probably the longest ride
home I’d ever had. He did his best to kind of
explain the idea of addiction and how it was holding my mom
captive and that was the night that I kind of realized my
relationship with my mom was never going to
be the same. By the time I was 13, I could
kind of pinpoint and figure out when my mom
had relapsed. As my mom, I know that she would
never do or say anything to intentionally hurt me whether
it be physically or emotionally, and I figured out that when
she was under the influence, it wasn’t
her talking. It was the drugs
and the alcohol. She had made a few comments over
the years that really got under my skin, but there was one day
in particular where it was just kind of the
last straw. I was sick of it. She had made a couple comments
about how she thought I was overweight and extremely
depressed and what she didn’t realize was that my depression
was me just trying to cope with the whole situation and I had a
really hard time handling it, and it was a decision that I
really never wanted to make, but I eventually decided
to cut contact with her. I really didn’t want to but
it definitely felt necessary. My grades were slipping. I was feeling depressed and I
was having a hard time finding a reason to smile, which
really just isn’t like me. In a recent study
conducted in eastern India, 30 children of alcoholic parents
and 30 children of non-alcoholic parents were analyzed to
identify potential effects of parental addiction
on their children, and they found that in the
child’s relationship with the mother, things
like indifference, neglect, rejection and symbolic
punishment were only present in the child’s relationship
with the addicted mother. Other characteristics include
lower levels of family cohesion and higher levels of
conflict, which of course, those lower levels
of family cohesion is just the politically correct way of
saying that nobody wants to be around an addict. So that’s why I decided to
separate from my mom and unfortunately she passed away
when I was just 16 years old – so 2 years ago – before we ever
really got a chance to build our relationship again, but I’ve
definitely learned to cherish the time that her
and I spent together, although it was pretty short. A common misconception of
members of my in-group is that we never have a relationship
with our parent, which at least in my case
is absolutely not true. Through all of my mom’s
struggles we definitely had our mother-daughter moments. We went to Carowinds. We went to the
Renaissance Festival. We did all sorts of
science experiments at home. We mixed the cornstarch and
water to make that oobleck mixture where it’s a solid
sometimes and a liquid sometimes and then we’d bust
glow sticks open and add the glow
stick liquid. That was just the kind
of stuff that we did. But one of my favorite things
about my mom is that whenever a family member or a
close friend was upset, she wouldn’t ask
you if you were okay, she wouldn’t ask
you to talk about it, she would simply go to the store
and get what she liked to call warm and fuzzies –
little craft balls. They were all
different sizes. They had tinsel on it and she
would leave little bowls of them on your dresser or she would
leave some on your pillow. She dumped an entire bag in
my book bag one morning before school and I
had no idea. So that was just the kind of
stuff that I like to remember my mom for, not
the addiction. In a way I am pretty thankful
for the person that she was and for her addiction because it
taught me so much about myself. Since her passing, I did
whatever I could for the longest time to sort of distance
myself from this in-group. I didn’t want to talk about
whatever was plaguing me and I certainly didn’t want
anybody at school knowing that I had a
crazy mom. And because of my isolation I
never really felt like a member of the in-group or at
least not oftentimes and that was kind
of the point. But as time passed, I definitely
have come to realize that it’s not the worse thing in the world
because in a society where drugs are prevalent, a true knowledge
of the dangers of being roped into addiction is exclusive
to members of my in-group and closely related
in-groups. So to wrap things up, I kind of
want to leave you guys with a little quote or an idea that I
think is very applicable to my life and will be to yours as
well: and that is the parent’s life is the
child’s classroom. Whether it be
positive or negative, there are always things that
can be learned and observed. I have learned as my mother’s
daughter what kind of mom I want to be, what kind of
wife I want to be, and watching my mom make mistake
after mistake and continue to smile through all the pain is
definitely a characteristic that I want to inherit and so it’s
things like that that helps me cope and eventually accept my
membership into this in-group. Thank you. [applause] Questions? Okay.>>Isabel Coletti: Hi
I’m Isabel Coletti. I’m in Professor Graves’ LANG
120 class and my project or presentation will be the
narratives in ethnographies. So, what is an Ethnography? An ethnography is the research
paper or scholarly writing that an anthropologist would do
after fully immersing themselves within a culture. They write about their
experience and then they talk about, maybe, a conclusion
they came to based off of this. So, the narrative is the story
of the anthropologist when he first comes into the culture,
how he interacts with people, because it’s more than just the
facts of what the culture wears, what their religion is. It is more about, like, the
social aspect of a culture, you know? What really makes
it unique. So, Bronislaw Malinowski is
one of the – the first one to introduce the narrative. Before they would try to do
detatched kind of observations of a culture, and often
it was done by, like, white guys so they were
often probably patronizing, like, they don’t know what
they’re doing but they’re running around
without clothes on. He talked about how you need to
actually immerse yourself into the culture, you know,
interact and become kind of not, like, one of them because
you’re always going to be kind of not there but really
understand what their culture is about, what they value. So, why a narrative? This is actually a
quote from Malinowski, his whole introductory paragraph
is kind of a “how to” do, like, an ethnography. He talks about how you would
never in chemistry or physics, you know, not talk about
all of the things you did in an experiment when
writing a research paper. So in a less exact science
like ethnographies, you would try to do the
same thing, you know: the length of time devoted or
the observations that were made and what the manner of the
observations were and that’s where the narrative
comes into play. You talk about a
story, how you got there. Often with these stories,
this is from Malinowski again, is what it was like
when you first go there, how you were an outsider and
then your narrative usually can slowly develop into how you
became trusted by the culture and often this explains
what the culture values, what they wanted to see from
an outsider to really accept. And so the stories also
provide credibility, you know? As a reader, you want to
see that what you’re reading, the author is actually
well-researched. That’s why a lot of authors
quote other people. Like, “Yes, I
did research. These are other
things I found.” It’s the same
with the narrative. You know you talk about
“Yeah, I was actually there. I actually talked to people,
and this is why I came to these conclusions based on
these observations.” This guy, Geertz, talks about
cockfighting in Bali and how it was, like, a really big part
of their culture and their masculinity and this is why men
who devoted so much time to their roosters and
it’s funny because, well right now I’m showing
how he first got there and nobody
accepted him. It wasn’t until he joined the
people running away from the cops after a cockfight
that the cuture was like, “yeah, you’re one of
us, you know? You’re running from the
law and fighting chickens.” [laughs] This is actually our own
Professor Woods of Anthropology. He went to the Gabra tribe and
his research or claim was that, like, well he really
wanted to know why, what nomadic tribes
thought about boundaries. A lot of companies were coming
in drilling for oil and what the people thought and so the best
way to conduct that research instead of saying, like, “I
asked this and this was this” is he talked about the story: how
the people began to trust him, you know, what he observed
what the people were doing interacting with
the oil companies, how they saw themselves as
a nomadic tribe and so the narrative becomes very important
in understanding the research and field work done
and the opinions of the anthropologists
themselves. So, for example,
freshman culture. Last year throwing bananas
places weren’t a thing people ate bananas but this year it
seems like people like to leave bananas places, especially on
top of the Mills dorm building, and so you could just say “Well,
you’re just saying that.” But if I gave a narrative of my
own experience it might be more credible and it
would also come to be, like, why do you think they
leave bananas everywhere? Well, this is one
of my pictures. It’s almost off-campus but,
like, right on the edge someone’s like, “Yeah, I’m
gonna leave a banana there.” And so, my narrative would be:
“One day after work I’m driving up and I’m parking because I
have to run to my dorm room before I park my car somewhere
where I won’t get a ticket and it’s kind of dark Because it
gets dark really soon now. And so there’s these girls
and they’re about to throw a banana on top of Mills and
then they look at me because I got my brights on, like,
right down on them like I caught them on the spot and I said,
“Do it! I don’t care!” And so they did and that’s where
I kind of learned, wow, this is really
a thing. People are really
throwing bananas places. So that is my example, something
you guys might more understand of where I’m going where the
narrative really helps the credibility of the author come
to the conclusion where people don’t eat bananas anymore
if you’re at UNCA and that’s my
conclusion. Alright. Thank you! [applause] Any questions about where
these bananas are going?>>[Audience member]:Do
you think it’s a methaphor?
Like, what’s
going on there?
>>Coletti:What?
With the bananas?
>>[Audience member]:
Yeah.>>Coletti: I don’t know. I’m not a
Freshman anymore. You don’t get it either? Yeah, I mean like why,
why even have them if you’re not
going to eat them? Decoration. All right.>>Brooke Richardson: So, a
little bit of background story before I start
this presentation. I was originally going to do
a research paper on how we communicate emotion through
texts specifically through the internet and through different
forms of social media and then when we were in the
library leaning how to use Google Scholar and how to find
credible research sources I typed in 4chan because I
thought it would be funny and I didn’t think I
would find anything. There’s a lot of academic
research about 4chan! And so – [laughs] that’s how
I ended up here. And a lot of us grew up with
the internet especially if you’re a freshman and you may
have come across 4chan or Reddit or heard of the red pill
or incels and if you haven’t, we’ll cover them
so don’t worry. [laughs] Something we often
don’t consider are the psychosocial effects and dangers
of anonymity and harm that can be done to our
self or others. So, first a quick
note about the “red pill”. It’s a community devoted to
liberating men from a life of feminist delusion and the name
comes from the movieThe Matrixwhere the main character
Neo is given the choice between two pills: the blue pill which is to live
in the fantasy simulation state of oblivious – live
blissfully ignorant, or the red pill which
is, you know, wake up, know the truth, see
what’s really going on. And for a transphobic sexist
misogynistic community to use a metaphor fromThe Matrixis kind
of ironic because the directors are in fact
transgender women. There we go. So, we all experience these
social relationships and these social groups whether on a
large scale or a small scale. Online these groups have taken
the form of message boards, Facebook groups. You might be a member of a
Facebook group for maybe your graduating class in high school
or even your graduating class here at UNCA or your mom might
be a member of a Facebook group for like her knitting
club or your neighborhood. [laughs] And we’re going to look
into how anonymity online affects these
relationships. Online and especially on social
media we create our own safe spaces for better
or for worse. It’s easy to block someone you
don’t like or someone dangerous with a click of a button or
unfriend someone or even just not reply to a message
or a comment thread. If you only want to see news or
posts from your family or even just pictures of racoons with
the tools we’ve been given we have the power to create and
nurture our own online spaces. So, 4chan is a messaging
board created in 2003. It’s infamous for kind
of being gross and awful. For purposes of this
presentation I’m going to be mostly just talking about the
board B which is the random board if there are users of
4chan in the audience. [laughs] Psychologist Joe Dawson
describes 4chan as “the putrid basement of the internet
serving as a hub for racist, homophobic, grotesque
images and text. Users are known for
trying to one up each other, disgust and troll new users
and show they have the lowest threshold for decency.” So, the Stanford Prison
experiment was a 7-day roleplay study conducted with
24 participants who didn’t know
each other. The goal was to investigate
mainly the psychological effects of perceived power
through hidden identity. 12 were selected as
guards and 12 as prisoners. They were costumes, the
guards were given sunglasses, hats, anything to constrict
their recognition and identity. Some guards began to get
aggressive even abusive realizing they had
this new-found power over their
prisoners. Soon enough other
guards joined in, in effort to give
the researchers something to
work with. And midway through this
experiment several prisoner participants had left and
the experiment ended up being terminated on the 6th day,
because it was just not good. [laughs] So, bringing that
back to the internet. The Stanford experiment helps
prove that the internet itself or these websites like 4chan
aren’t inherently bad. But using anonymous identities
and allowing ourselves to become disconnected from our online
identity can lead to aggression, hateful or vicious speech
with virtually no consequences. Another cyberpsychologist
John Suler describes this as the “online disinhibition effect.” The phenomena of flaming and
acting out online behaviors that often involve damaging others
or one’s self-image without any beneficial personal growth. Anonymity in a social setting
means that peers and other users only know what the
speaker is willing to let on or
even lie about. This is a principal factor in
toxic online behavior as it removes accountability and
causes dissonance between the user’s internet actions
and their real-life actions. So, this is my
favorite part: incels. It’s a portmanteau
meaning “involuntary celibate”. It’s a community of mostly
men who use 4chan or anonymous forums like incels.me to
complain about how they’re too ugly to be attractive
romantically or sexually. And they believe that this is
society or the world against them and that they
were just born this way. According to a linguistic
study published in 2018 the most popular keywords on the
forum incels.me refer to gender, physical traits, internet slang
and other common words like negative words like:
hard, nothing, never, uncertain adverbs:
maybe, probably and why and pessimistic
emotions. So, what do we do about problems
with anonymity or toxic forums and things like that? Do we restrict them? Are we able to interfere? Is there anything really
that wecando? [laughs] We’ll never be able to regulate
the internet and still allow freedom of speech. As we can see from Zimbardo’s
study which was the Stanford Prison Experiment,
humans will be humans. Dissonance in groups and social
identities are so ingrained into the bones of
our humanity. We have to foster
healthier systems. More moderation on
anonymous forums, better access to online therapy
or even requiring anonymous forums to register
with a username. As a society we should do better
and as humans wecando better. Thank you. [applause] Does anybody have
any questions? Okay.>>Fin Carter:
Good evening. My name is Fin Carter. I represent Dr. Wray and today
I’m going to be talking about why – some reasons why we should
be editing the human germline and really what genetic
editing is as a whole. I’m sure you’ve probably
heard of maybe CRISPR or genetic editing and recently some things
happened just a couple days regarding CRISPR
and genetic editing. So, what is
genetic editing? Well to understand
genetic editing, one must understand the genome,
essentially understanding DNA. What does DNA do? As you may know it involves
traits like hair color, eye color, height,
several things. So, therefore genome
editing is the editing of DNA. Now, genetic editing has been
in use since about 1974 when the first animal was genetically
modified which was a mouse. In 1982 the first plant was
modified which was tobacco. People more recently have
discovered that we can edit the genes of humans and
this is using CRISPR. This is you know something
you may have heard of. Now what is CRISPR? Well CRISPR was first developed
in 1987 by a Japanese scientist to study theE. colibacteria. Jennifer Doudna and Emmanuel
Charpentier along with a team of scientists in 2012 discovered
that it could be used to genetically modify people or
at least change their genes. So, with that in mind before I
continue let me get back to what the germline is. There are two types of genetic
edits: somatic and germline. Somatic editing ends with the
subject meaning, you know, it does not pass down to
future generations. What I’m focusing on is
germline editing which is typically done in a human embryo
which means that no matter what you do within a human embryo,
it is a germline edit. Meaning that it passes down
to an embryo if they become a person, their children. So, obviously passing down genes
has a pretty massive implication and I think they are
good implications. So, why should you care
about germline editing? Well when we’re speaking about
germline editing and really genetic editing as a whole most
people are talking about editing out genetic disorders. With germline editing you may
essentially eliminate or erase genetic disorders
from the human genome. Future generations won’t have to
deal with these disorders and it allows people to have children
in situations that they otherwise couldn’t. Perhaps both
parents carry a recessive gene for
cystic fibrosis. There is a – there will be a
100% chance that they will have a child without cystic
fibrosis using CRISPR. Now, opponents of CRISPR argue
that there already has been a option for parents in this
situation which is true. This is PGD which is often
used in tandem with invitro fertilization or IVF. Now, PGD which stands for
Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis has been in use
since 1989 when the first IVF baby was born. The way PGD works is you are
given an array of embryos and you are essentially told,
you know – let’s say you are diagnosing for cystic fibrosis;
this embryo will have a 10% chance of developing cystic
fibrosis, you know, etcetera. And in some situations, it is
extremely effective to the point where there is no
chance, you know. So, that’s the
gist of what PGD is, but I believe CRISPR can do
this a little bit better. Like I said with PGD
you’re often given achanceof inheriting a disorder. So, you know it’s
not 100%, 100%. CRISPR on the
other hand would be, you essentially just edit out
the gene and there is absolutely no chance, you know. Another big problem that kind of
arises from PGD is that you are picking embryos, you know –
picking embryos rather than just treating one which could be
deemed unethical in of itself and that could be fairly
traumatic to a parent who is having to, you know, pick over
several embryos all of which represent potentially a
completely different person. Another kind of thing that I
think a lot of people in the U. S. would deem unethical that
has been used with PGD is using PGD for basically choosing
the sex of your child. There’s been documented cases
in places like China and India in which they
choose male embryos. CRISPR you can’t change,
you know, your sex. Furthermore, there are
technologies that are currently being developed to further
analyze these embryos as in with PGD you’ll be able to understand
your potential baby’s hair color, eye color, height,
various traits which kind of throws out the argument
of not using CRISPR, you know, the designer baby
argument which is probably on a lot of
people’s minds. So, to get to the designer baby
argument and why – I mean really the designer baby argument as
a whole is somewhat of a myth. So, yes while designer
babies are based in fact, it isn’t as black and white as
you can make a very intelligent and very
strong person. Traits like skin
color, intelligence, physical ability are all what
are considered polygenic traits. Meaning hundreds if not
thousands of genes are involved in your skin color,
your athletic ability, your intelligence, which
means it would be very hard to engineer a white embryo which
is, you know, when people are talking about CRISPR,
we’re typically talking about
eugenics. So, and on top of that really
with intellectual capability and athletic ability studies have
shown many times that things like intelligence and athletic
ability are heavily relied on nurture, you know,
how you grew up. If you grew up in an environment
that, you know, stimulates intellectual growth, then you
probably will be a little bit more intelligent. But let’s say you have – for
athletic ability for example, one of you could have had, you
know, the gene makeup to be the best weight lifter
in the world. Perhaps you’ve never
lifted a weight ever, you won’t ever be an
Olympic weight lifter, there’s ahugeamount of nurture
involved with things like intelligence and
athleticism. So, it’s not as simple as just
making an intelligent embryo. So anyway, to get back to my
final point on why germline editing is a, I think, a
positive thing is that with the elimination of genetic disorders
comes a large amount of money for us in our
healthcare system. So I just have
2 examples here. Cystic fibrosis: there are
30,000 people affected with cystic fibrosis in
the United States. It costs $1.1 billion
per year. Hemophilia with 100,000
sorry – 20,000 people affected in the United States, costs $100,000 to $350,000
per year per person. This is a massive amount of
money for 50,000 people and this is only
2 disorders. Another example for hemophilia,
in Portugal there are 800 people affected with hemophilia, it
accounts for 4.4% of their healthcare cost. That’s a lot. So, there’s this huge monetary,
you know, kind of incentive to edit out these
genetic disorders. And this isn’t just – I’m
glossing over the fact that a lot of these disorders – and
this brings me to my conclusion a lot of these disorders
really are somewhat terrible. So, with more research
CRISPR could provide the end of suffering from
genetic disorder. Genetic disorders like cystic
fibrosis, you have an average lifespan of 37
years old. Duchenne’s muscular dystrophy,
average lifespan of 27. I know someone
with cystic fibrosis. He spends 2 months a year in
the hospital getting his lungs pumped and he knows he’s going
to die in 10 years, you know. I think if we had the capability
to eliminate these disorders, I would argue that it’s
almost unethicalnotto. Further, it provides a viable
option for parents, you know, over PGD and allows more
money for healthcare. And that’s all I
have for you guys. Thank you very much. I’d be willing to
take questions. [applause]>>[audience member]: There
must be repercussions to removing a part
of your genome. What are some of the arguments
that have come up in your study?>>Finn: The main argument
right now is that we simply don’t
know enough. There must be
some repercussions, we simply don’t know if
there will be repercussions. So, I should have
clarified a little bit more. I’m not arguing to – right now
we should be genetically altering all the babies, in
fact I’m arguing against that in the end because
that’s kind of a – we simply don’t
know enough. I don’t know if you’ve heard
but just a couple of days ago a person in China claims
that – and I’m not sure – there hasn’t been a
whole lot of evidence. To me it kind of
sounds like a hoax but he at least claims to have
edited 2 embryos and birthed them to be
resistant to HIV. The huge backlash is essentially
that: what could happen to them? They didn’t really edit anything
insane, you know, it’s just a gene for HIV resistance
but we simply don’t have any idea
right now. There needs to be
much more research.>>[audience member]:
[indistinct question]>>Finn: CRISPR is a
much easier and – it’s essentially – there have
been ways to genetically edit in the past and I don’t know the –
I didn’t focus on the actual science behind how it’s done but
from what I’ve gathered CRISPR is essentially like a –
almost a do it at home kind of like level
of easiness.>>[audience member]: Right,
that was the method that – >>Finn: Yes, yes they did
use CRISPR for that, yeah. Anything else? Cool. Thank you very much. [applause]>>Arden Stockdale
-Giesler: Hi, I’m Arden.>>Amber James:
I’m Amber.>>Arden: And we’re representing
Professor Johnsons’ 12:30 class. The title of this piece isRough
Draft 244
and that’s partially because out entire class is
focused on revision and editing and growing from
your own work. And the 244 part is partially
because we’ve written so many revisions and drafts that it
feels like there’s been 244 but also because our
classroom is room 244. That’s where all
of this happened. ♪ [music] ♪>>Speaker #1: I am from
reluctance to speak your mind, and to cherish
old traditions.>>Aubrie Holcomb: I am from
street lights and fireflies, from softballs
fields and late nights.>>Arden: I’m from a long
history of English degrees, from creative
writing and Ph.D’s.>>Speaker #2: I am
from growing towns, crowded highways,
and busy streets. From loud hardworking
and caring. I am from bad love and
too much understanding.>>Speaker #3: For
my research project, I did a topic on the stigma of
the fashion industry and how it’s not just, I
guess, something for skinny
rich people. It’s also a huge creative
process behind it, and it’s also
for everyone. And it can actually help
boost things like self-esteem, and even help with
career opportunities and first impressions.>>Amber: My Name
is Amber James. I did my research on veterans
coming back home from war. It was really important for me
to do this because I know that there’s so much
about mental health, but there’s also not a lot
about physical disabilities. And my father’s a veteran, my
best friend’s dad is a veteran. I know many,
many veterans. So, it was important to me to
kind of bring light to the fact that yes, there is mental health
problems that we need to address in veterans, but there’s
also physical disabilities that aren’t talked about, and the
way that we talk about them needs to change.>>Alex Ferris: For
my research project, I decided to learn about a genre
that I feel is very important in sculpting the landscape
of current cinema: classic film noir. This is a genre that I had
very little experience with, but I had a lot of fun
taking out the time to learn more about it. I read textbooks,
newspaper articles, books, and I watched a few
films from directors like Orson Welles, Howard
Hawks, Carol Reed, and Alfred Hitchcock. The product of my research
was a best practices guide to productive film noir viewership,
and it can sort of be applied to any genre. This is a really great
experience because I’ve always been very fond of neo-noir
films of the 80s and 90s, but I’ve never taken time out
to learn about the background of the genre in
classic film noir.>>Allie Peterson: I did
my research project on misconceptions about mental
health and the harm that comes with labeling. For my final project, I wrote
a Shel Silverstein-inspired children’s book
about my topic.>>Arden: My name is
Arden Stockdell-Giesler, and I researched children’s
books with hard realities. Children learn
through literature, so why shouldn’t we be
passionate about what that is? In this research process, I
became so moved that I ended up writing a children’s
book of my own. The inspiration for my piece,
Wings of a White Butterfly
, stemmed from my passion
for creative writing, my personal experiences
with hard realities, and my drive to be the person
I needed when I was younger.>>Colleen Corbe Percival:
Reading an article inRolling Stonemagazine that
ended up developing into multilayers of research and
ultimately became a photo essay.>>Speaker #4: So, what will
you remember about LANG 120?>>Cammie Varner:
Yeah, I definitely, like, discovered my
voice through this class, by making my writings more
personal and vulnerable than I ever have. You know, as opposed to
being in high school and writing formulaic essays
for the classes, and I really
admire that.>>Speaker #5: One thing
I’ll really remember is the story course.>>Speaker #6: I
think just how, like, comfortable the environment was,
like it was really easy to share stuff we’ve written and
stuff with each other.>>Speaker #7: And I
enjoyed our instructor. She let us have an open idea
to what we wanted to do in the class, which I thought was – and
take part in a lot of the things ourselves and
decisions. So I think
that was good.>>Speaker #8: How have you
grown as a writer this semester?>>Holcomb: I
think I learned that, you know, revision doesn’t
have to be super stressful, and it can lead you to
really cool important things.>>Corbe Percival: I’ll take
away a lot of information on how to set up an infographic
[laughs] and get on the computer and find resources.>>Holcomb: Question is what
have you learned about the practice of revision?>>Varner: Yeah, I discovered
that it’s a never-ending process for me, personally. I always am finding, you
know, something new to add or something new to
revise that doesn’t quite, you know, work out the first
time the way I thought it did. And that’s just a new way
of thinking that I had never realized before.>>Speaker #9: What were some of
the pieces you created that made an impression on you?>>Holcomb: My favorite, or
like one that really made an impression was
the little library. Because I got to, like,
throwback to my childhood and think about books that
impacted me when I was younger, and made me – possibly made
me – the person I am today.>>Speaker #10: Why
do you like to write?>>Cormac: Because I
want tomeow-meow! ♪ [music] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪>>Mackenzie Humphrey: I am
going to continue to taste the chlorine on my lips and
force myself to grow stronger through hard work
in the pool. I am going to grow as a student,
and obtain a plethora of knowledge that will prepare
me for my future ambitions of becoming a lawyer.>>Speaker #11: Forward,
and never looking back at things I
cannot change. I am going to look for the
positive things in life.>>Speaker #12: I’m going
into the next semester, applying what I learned. Since my major is
not just numbers, I feel my foundation
is set in stone.>>Speaker #13: I am
going around the world, or maybe to the stars. I don’t know the destination,
but I know I’ll go far. ♪ [music] ♪ [applause]>>Arden: And we would
like to thank Lily and Mackenzie for making
that amazing video for us because they did
that themselves. [applause] Are there any
questions or – Okay, cool. So thank you
all for coming! That was great! Have a good night. If you’re sitting
in a black chair: if you will help carry that
out and put it on the rack and also if you presented
and you’re still here I have a certificate
for you. Okay, y’all have
a good night! Good luck
with exams! ♪ [closing music] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪

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